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Reuel Rodgers | Rewiring Linked Fate: Bringing Back History, Agency, and PowerTitle

December 22, 2021 – from Cambridge University Press
Linked fate, the concept introduced by Dawson almost three decades ago, reoriented the study of racism and political behavior in the United States. The scholarship traditionally had focused on the racial psychology of whites and how racism seeps into their political views and actions. Dawson proposed the Black utility heuristic theory and linked fate, its associated measure, to investigate the political behavior of Blacks, the minority group most harmed by racism. Since then, linked fate has become a ubiquitous variable of interest in research on minority group politics. Yet the research program around linked fate is due for some extension. Most studies gloss over the fact that the Black utility heuristic theory is historically and socially conditional.

Brian Harrison | LGBTQ Life in America: Examining the Facts

December 1, 2021 – from ABC CLIO
This book provides readers with a clear and unbiased understanding of what it means to be LGBTQ in the United States in the 2020s. Beginning with the origins of LGBTQ identity and history, the book addresses the current status of the LGBTQ community; gender expectations and performance in American culture; transgender and non-binary identity; behaviors and outcomes associated with LGBTQ people; and, finally, diversity within the LGBTQ community. Utilizing authoritative sources and lay-friendly definitions and explanations, this work punctures myths, misconceptions, and incorrect assumptions about sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expectations and norms.

Daniel J. Galvin | Alt-Labor’s turn toward politics and public policy to combat the exploitation of low-wage workers

November 4, 2021 – from Economic Policy Institute
Over the last two decades, nonprofit “alt-labor” groups—a diverse lot of organizations consisting of community-based worker centers and other social and economic justice groups whose primary missions include fighting for workers’ rights—have emerged in numerous cities around the nation to help nonunionized, low-wage workers combat exploitation. During this time they have become increasingly adept at using public policy, rather than collective bargaining or direct economic interventions, to achieve their goals and to strengthen basic workers’ rights.

Chloe N. Thurston | Racial Inequality, Market Inequality, and the American Political Economy

October 29, 2021 – from The American Political Economy: Politics, Markets, and Power
A study of Boston’s racial wealth gap made headlines in late 2017 when it revealed that the median net worth of the city’s Black households was only $8, compared to $247,000 among white households (Hill 2017; Johnson 2017; Muñoz et al. 2015). The gap in Boston may have been starker than in the nation as a whole, but the latter was also striking. In 2016, the median net worth of Black and Hispanic households nationwide was $17,000 and $20,700, respectively, compared to $171,000 for whites (Dettling et al. 2017). The disparities amongst households with children were even more pronounced. In 2016, Black households with children held 1 percent of the wealth of non-Hispanic white households with children (Percheski and Gibson-Davis 2020: 1).

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | Race and the Bully Pulpit: The U.S. Presidency and the Quest of Equality in America

October 28, 2021 – from Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Politics
In calling for articles for this special issue we sought to feature the institution of the US presidency and its implications for racial and ethnic politics in the United States. It was our sense that the race, ethnicity, and politics (REP) literature would benefit from such an emphasis by increasing and complementing the modest amount of extant research on the presidency within the subfield. At the time, bringing in racial dimensions would enrich the presidency research. While presidency scholars have often used case studies about issues racial and ethnic politics to develop theories about the functioning of the institution (see, for example, Graham, Reference Graham1990; Milkis et al., Reference Milkis, Tichenor and Blessing2013; Tichenor, Reference Tichenor2016), presidential studies writ large has been slow to adopt core theoretical perspectives from the REP subfield.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | Growing Black and Latino Power in Congress

October 22, 2021 – from Humphrey School University of Minnesota
Dr. Alvin Tillery, Dr. Michael Minta and Dr. Jamil Scott discuss the growing power of Black and Latinos in Congress in relation to the BLM protest movement and if Congress and more mainstream Black and Latino civil rights organizations are addressing the priorities of the BLM movement.

Alvin Tillery | Growing Black and Latino Power in Congress

October 22, 2021 – from Humphrey School UMN
Dr. Alvin Tillery, Dr. Michael Minta and Dr. Jamil Scott discuss the growing power of Black and Latinos in Congress in relation to the BLM protest movement and if Congress and more mainstream Black and Latino civil rights organizations are addressing the priorities of the BLM movement.

Sally A. Nuamah | Schools need family input on COVID spending. Here’s how they can get it.

October 21, 2021 – from Chalkbeat.org
“If the school district wants to ensure that they’re talking to all the people, much like when we do the Census, you have to do the work of actually knocking on the doors and getting people who wouldn’t ordinarily come out, to come out,” said Sally Nuamah, a Northwestern University researcher who studies public participation in schools. “It’s about commitment and investment.”

Linus Hoeller | One in three Afghanistan and Iraq Vets sees Extremism among their Ranks

October 21, 2021 – from The World Uncensored
More than one in three Afghanistan and Iraq veterans said in a survey that they perceived extremism as existing within the military and within the veteran community, the head of a veterans’ organization told the House Veterans Affairs Committee hearing on Wednesday. According to an ongoing survey of over 3,500 former members of military members by the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, more than one-third of the veterans also said they have directly experienced extremism, IAVA CEO Jeremy Butler told the committee.
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