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November

Sally A. Nuamah | Closed for Democracy How Mass School Closure Undermines the Citizenship of Black Americans

November 1, 2022 – from Cambridge University Press
Every year, over 1,000 public schools are permanently closed across the United States. And yet, little is known about their impacts on American democracy. Closed for Democracy is the ?rst book to systematically study the political causes and democratic consequences of mass public school closures in the United States. The book investigates the declining presence of public schools in large cities and their impacts on the Americans most directly affected – poor Black citizens. It documents how these mass school closure policies target minority communities, making them feel excluded from the public goods afforded to equal citizens. In response, targeted communities become superlative participators to make their voices heard. Nevertheless, the high costs and low responsiveness associated with the policy process undermines their faith in the power of political participation.

October

James N. Druckman | The COVID States Project #92: The Mar-A-Lago Search

October 24, 2022 – from Center for Open Science
Key takeaways • A large majority of Americans quickly became aware of the Mar-A-Lago search. Overall, 81 percent reported that they were aware of the search. Additionally, 82 percent of those who took the survey within a week after the search were already aware of it. • Overall, Americans approved of the search by a 51-27 margin. Another 22 percent neither supported nor opposed the search. • Democrats overwhelmingly supported the FBI search of Mar-A-Lago by an 84-3 margin. Over two thirds (69 percent) of Democrats strongly supported the search. • A strong majority of Republicans opposed the search by a 64-13 margin. Additionally, 47 percent of Republicans strongly opposed the search. • Independents were nearly twice as likely to support the search as they were to oppose it, with a 47-24 margin. Close to a third (32 percent) of independents strongly supported the search.

Daniel J. Galvin | Illinois takes center stage in battle over union rights vote

October 19, 2022 – from AP News
One expert said the significance can’t be understated of what it would mean for Illinois to join the short list of states — Missouri, Hawaii and New York — with similar constitutional amendments. “A big important state like Illinois enshrining this right to their constitution sends a signal across the country that the right to bargain collectively is a fundamental right,” said Daniel Galvin, who teaches political science at Northwestern University and is a faculty fellow at the school’s Institute for Policy Research. Predictably, the fight over the Illinois measure has fallen along party lines, with Democrats backing labor and Republicans backing industry.

Laurel Harbridge-Yong | In partisan year, some Democrats stress work with Trump, GOP

October 17, 2022 – from Roll Call
Campaigning on bipartisanship might seem out of step in what’s often viewed as a hyperpolarized era. But it’s a smart strategy, said Laurel Harbridge-Yong, a political scientist at Northwestern University. The party that controls the White House typically loses seats in a president’s first midterm election, and Biden’s sputtering popularity rating, along with voter concerns about rising costs, has created conditions that benefit Republicans. “Those are all reasons why members in competitive districts want to differentiate themselves from the party and say, 'Hey, you might be frustrated with the Democrats as a whole, but here are reasons why you should still vote for me,’” Harbridge-Yong said. “Individual legislators have a greater incentive to focus on bipartisanship and compromise at a time when being tied to the party is threatening or risky.”

Laurel Harbridge-Yong | In partisan year, some Democrats stress work with Trump, GOP

October 17, 2022 – from Roll Call
Campaigning on bipartisanship might seem out of step in what’s often viewed as a hyperpolarized era. But it’s a smart strategy, said Laurel Harbridge-Yong, a political scientist at Northwestern University. The party that controls the White House typically loses seats in a president’s first midterm election, and Biden’s sputtering popularity rating, along with voter concerns about rising costs, has created conditions that benefit Republicans. “Those are all reasons why members in competitive districts want to differentiate themselves from the party and say, 'Hey, you might be frustrated with the Democrats as a whole, but here are reasons why you should still vote for me,’” Harbridge-Yong said. “Individual legislators have a greater incentive to focus on bipartisanship and compromise at a time when being tied to the party is threatening or risky.”

James N. Druckman | Survey: Governors’ Approval Ratings Hold Steady Before November Elections

October 12, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
Interestingly, the researchers find a large “partisan approval gap” between Republican and Democratic incumbents, with Republican voters rating Republican governors lower than Democratic voters' ratings of Democratic governors. Independents also contribute to that gap as they tend to assess Democratic governors more highly than Republican ones. “The differences in gubernatorial approval, with Democrats expressing more enthusiasm for their party’s governors than Republicans do for their party’s, could be notably consequential if it influences turnout, said IPR political scientist James Druckman. “And turnout surely will play a crucial role in some of these close races.” Druckman co-authored the report with scholars from Harvard, Rutgers, and Northeastern universities as part of the COVID States Project.

James N. Druckman | Megastudy Identifying Successful Interventions to Strengthen Americans’ Democratic Attitudes (WP-22-38)

October 12, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
However, we do find substantial overlap between the interventions that affect partisananimosity and those that affect a number of important outcomes, including biased evaluation ofpoliticized facts, general social distrust, and preferences for social distance from outpartisans. Wealso found that support for undemocratic candidates was moved by interventions that affecteither partisan animosity or support for undemocratic practices, suggesting two separate causalpaths. Taken together, our findings provide a toolkit of promising interventions for practitioners,and shed new theoretical light on challenges facing American democracy.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | Northwestern scholar establishes Reparations Research Collaborative

October 11, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
The CSDD’s Evanston Reparations Research Collaborative will examine the ordinance’s impact on public sentiments about race relations within the Evanston community and the functioning of municipal government. The collaborative’s advisory board will bring together city officials, social science researchers and civic leaders to help oversee the project. The research will be conducted by a team of undergraduate students who will work in the field. A graduate student will design and implement the studies, as well as train the field researchers. The collaborative is led by CSDD director Alvin B. Tillery, professor of political science in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, and a resident of Evanston.

Tabitha Bonilla | Turnout unclear at Evanston’s upcoming midterm elections

October 10, 2022 – from The Daily Northwestern
SESP Prof. Tabitha Bonilla said areas with high average incomes and education levels like Evanston tend to see higher voter turnout in general. People in lower-income areas, however, may face various barriers to voting. Hourly wage workers may lose income when taking time off to go vote. People of color are also more likely to encounter difficulties when voting, with Black and Latino voters often facing longer lines at polls, according to recent data from the Brennan Center. “If it is harder for you to vote, it’s less likely that you’re going to be able to,” Bonilla said.

Kimberly Marion Suiseeya | Emissions data show slow recovery in energy consumption from pandemic

October 7, 2022 – from Evanston Roundtable
When a majority of council members vote to approve a draft of the budget, it is adopted as policy for the next calendar year. Board member Kimberly Marion Suiseeya suggested implementing an accountability system through a city ordinance, such that the city’s budget is required to include CARP goals for it to be legal and valid. She said this could help reinforce CARP against mission drift and apathy from city officials into the future. “You can’t have it relying on the city manager and the political will of the city council to do these things,” Marion Suiseeya said. “If you have something as ambitious as CARP with no strong implementation mechanisms, then you’re constantly pushing against the forces that don’t necessarily need to be there.”

September

Kimberly Marion Suiseeya | Avoiding “Backdraft” in Climate Policy - When Mitigation or Adaptation Actions Spark Conflict

September 30, 2022 – from Columbia Climate School: The Earth Institute
In 2013, a groundbreaking report from the Environmental Change & Security Program of the Woodrow Wilson Center warned that efforts to cut planet-heating pollution and climate impacts could spark conflict, undercutting development and global security. The “backdraft” dynamic described in that report has since been echoed in concepts like “maladaptation” and “mal-mitigation” - where climate policies produce adverse impacts on marginalized or politically excluded populations.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | Queen Elizabeth’s Death Prompts Mourning But Also Discussions on Monarchy and Empire

September 29, 2022 – from WTTW
Alvin Tillery, professor of political science and director of the Center for the Study of Diversity and Democracy at Northwestern University, has long studied racial inequality in the United States. He says the toxic legacy of European and British colonialism is everywhere. “It’s impossible for me to do my work as a scholar of these kinds of modern racial inequalities in America and not see the fingerprints of British colonials everywhere,” said Tillery. “The threads are intimately connected. The American race story starts with the Royal African Company.” The Royal Africa Company was founded in 1660 by the Duke of York, the brother of then King Charles II, who went on to become King James II and transported enslaved people from West Africa to the Americas.

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd | Sacred States: Beyond the Secular-Religious Dialectic

September 28, 2022 – from University of Notre Dame; Keough School of Global Affairs
The sacralization of the Israeli state is especially noxious to the two prominent Palestinian editors of this volume, and understandably so. Noting that most discussions of religion in politics have focused on non-state actors, their collection ably turns the tables to examine and critique the sacralization of the state and its role in perpetuating settler colonial violence in Israel and beyond. To this end, the editors thoughtfully juxtapose case studies that are rarely considered side-by-side, including Buddhist nationalism in Sri Lanka, Zionism in Israel/Palestine, competing nationalisms in Northern Ireland, and Hindutva in India—even as Zionism gets the lion’s share of attention. I was eager to dive in.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | The personal is political: NU professor’s journey to studying reparations

September 27, 2022 – from Evanston Roundtable
The study is funded by the Lewis-Sebring Family Foundation. The center is partnering with the National Opinion Research Center and is in the drafting phase of the study. Tillery estimates he will have results of the research by early spring. Tillery said he is conducting this study to see what concerns residents have and hopefully dispel the assumption that reparations efforts cause racial resentment. “I think that it’s very likely that in a place like Evanston – highly educated, more affluent than the average community, that values diversity and tolerance – it’s very likely that we don’t see these spikes of resentment,” Tillery said.

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd | "Many Iranian women are tired of their appearance being regulated by the state"

September 25, 2022 – from La Tercera
To understand the demonstrations from a Western perspective, but with the rigor of someone who has studied the subject in depth, La Tercera spoke with the American political scientist Elizabeth Shakman Hurd, professor of Political Science and Religious Studies and an expert on the Middle East at Northwestern University. A week after the death of the young Mahsa Amini, the protests in Iran have not abated. What are the keys to understanding what is currently happening in the country? Iranians, and in particular women from all walks of life, are demonstrating to call for a democratic transformation in Iran. It is both a continuation of previous movements calling for reforms, and a new spontaneous movement founded on women's organization and protest against state regulation, repression and violence.

Marissa Brookes | NSF Award: Build and Broaden 3.0: Assessing the Effects of a Publicly Engaged Scholarship

September 7, 2022 – from National Science Foundation
This project seeks to learn the impact of publicly engaged scholarship and contribute to diversifying the academic community. The study will measure the social and research impact of public engagement, or scholars communicating beyond academic audiences and sharing their expertise with a broader, more general audience. There is a small but growing academic literature that shows scholarship that is publicly engaged can have greater academic and societal reach, but there is little empirical evidence of this relationship between engagement and reach when it comes to social science research. To examine whether and the extent to which there is such a relationship, this study will use a randomized controlled trial involving different public engagement strategies that publicize social science scholarship and measure indicators of academic and societal reach. The study will include a survey...

Ely Orrego Torres | Hemos encontrado muchas voces críticas dentro de la iglesia

September 7, 2022 – from Nacional AM870
Causas urgentes dialogó con la politóloga de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Ely Orrego Torres acerca de los desafíos que se presentan entre la religión y la política, principalmente en Latinoamérica, en el marco del curso que inicia el 31 de agosto y se denomina "Estado laico en América Latina: perspectivas feministas" el cual se encuentra enmarcado en una Escuela de Formación junto a la ONG “Otros Cruces” mediante un contexto crítico.

James Druckman | Ways to strengthen democracy, as determined by Stanford-led ‘mega study’

September 7, 2022 – from Stanford News
American democracy is at risk, Stanford scholars and others have warned. A Stanford-led project has identified a number of strategies that are effective in reducing Americans’ support for undemocratic practices and candidates. (Image credit: Getty Images) Many studies have found anti-democratic attitudes and support for partisan violence are at concerning levels among the American public, partisan animosity is growing, and Americans are willing to compromise democratic principles for partisan gain. Stanford sociologist Robb Willer is among those worried about what these attitudes mean for the stability of democracy in the U.S. To counter some of the risks Willer and many Americans are troubled by, Willer launched a massive, three-year project to test a variety of simple and scalable ways to counter anti-democratic beliefs that threaten the country’s political future.

James Druckman | Ways to strengthen democracy, as determined by Stanford-led ‘mega study’

September 7, 2022 – from Stanford News
American democracy is at risk, Stanford scholars and others have warned. A Stanford-led project has identified a number of strategies that are effective in reducing Americans’ support for undemocratic practices and candidates. (Image credit: Getty Images) Many studies have found anti-democratic attitudes and support for partisan violence are at concerning levels among the American public, partisan animosity is growing, and Americans are willing to compromise democratic principles for partisan gain. Stanford sociologist Robb Willer is among those worried about what these attitudes mean for the stability of democracy in the U.S. To counter some of the risks Willer and many Americans are troubled by, Willer launched a massive, three-year project to test a variety of simple and scalable ways to counter anti-democratic beliefs that threaten the country’s political future.

James N. Druckman | One Nation, Too Divided?

September 6, 2022 – from Kellogg Insight
"Historically, when social scientists thought of advanced democracies, including the United States, they didn’t really think about things like democratic backsliding. But the last five years have seen a rise of concern about authoritarian tendencies in the United States. It seems evident that a lot of partisans on either side would potentially privilege their party over democratic processes. So what can we do to try to ameliorate those tendencies? Because we might start seeing real undermining of not only democratic norms, but actual constitutional procedures, and then violence."

August

Andrew Thompson | ADL Center for Antisemitism Research Announces 10 Grants for Inaugural Fellowship

August 31, 2022 – from The Anti-Defamation League
ADL (the Anti-Defamation League) today announced the selection of 10 research projects for its inaugural Center for Antisemitism Research Fellowship, which engages leading university researchers in identifying new approaches to combating antisemitism in society. Does correcting misinformation or cultivating empathy reduce antisemitism? Dr. Catie Bailard, associate professor of media and public affairs, George Washington University; Andrew Thompson, assistant professor of political science, GWU; and Rebekah Tromble, Associate Professor and Director of the Institute for Data, Democracy, and Politics,...

Ian Hurd | Gorbachev changed the world' Experts available to discuss legacy of former Soviet leader

August 31, 2022 – from Northwestern News
One thing he offered was proof that it is possible to break out of entrenched ways of thinking about one’s place in the world. He brought the Cold War to an end by refusing to see the world as a zero-sum status contest with the U.S. He came to leadership in a world where it was taken for granted that the U.S. and the USSR were in competition with each other. “This competition was seen as natural, inevitable and zero-sum. Both governments chose their policies on the assumption that the most important thing was to keep up appearances of being stronger than the other. Gorbachev seemed to know that there was nothing inevitable about fighting for scraps of status around the world, and that the costs of doing so were unacceptable. And so he stepped out of the competitive paradigm and sought to invest in improving domestic conditions instead. He scrambled American foreign policy by refusing...

Mara Suttmann-Lea | Local election offices often are missing on social media – and the information they do post often gets ignored

August 31, 2022 – from The Conversation
Local election officials are trying to share voting information with the public on social media but may be missing some key platforms – and the voters who use them. In early July 2022, for instance, young voters in Boone County, Missouri, complained that they had missed the registration deadline to vote in the county’s Aug. 2 primary election. They claimed no one “spread the word on social media.” The local election office in that county actually has a social media presence on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and TikTok. But its accounts don’t have many followers and aren’t as active as, say, celebrity or teenage accounts are. As a result, election officials’ messages may never reach their audience.

Daniel Galvin | Labor Unions Are Key in Protecting Workers’ Rights in States

August 30, 2022 – from Northwestern Institute For Policy Research
Research by IPR political scientist Daniel Galvin, however, shows that union influence has remained significant. During the period of union membership decline from 1973 to 2014, states with higher rates of union membership passed more employment laws and created a wider range of rights and protections for workers than states with less of a union presence. According to Galvin, 90% of U.S. workers do not belong to a union and must look to employment laws to protect their rights instead. But where did these laws come from, and why do some states have more robust regulatory regimes than others? “I find that unions were largely responsible for their construction,” Galvin said. “Even as they were hemorrhaging members and struggling to survive, they were leading legislative campaigns to create stronger protections for all workers.”

Daniel Galvin | Labor Unions Are Key in Protecting Workers’ Rights in States

August 30, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
Research by IPR political scientist Daniel Galvin, however, shows that union influence has remained significant. During the period of union membership decline from 1973 to 2014, states with higher rates of union membership passed more employment laws and created a wider range of rights and protections for workers than states with less of a union presence. According to Galvin, 90% of U.S. workers do not belong to a union and must look to employment laws to protect their rights instead. But where did these laws come from, and why do some states have more robust regulatory regimes than others? “I find that unions were largely responsible for their construction,” Galvin said. “Even as they were hemorrhaging members and struggling to survive, they were leading legislative campaigns to create stronger protections for all workers.”

Kimberly Marion Suiseeya | Northwestern partners with Indigenous scientists to conserve Great Lakes wetlands

August 29, 2022 – from https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2022/08/northwestern-partners-with-indigenous-scientists-to-conserve-great-lakes-wetlands/
A Northwestern University-led research team has received a $5 million grant over five years from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop new methods to help mitigate the effects of climate change on the Great Lakes and its surrounding natural ecosystems. By partnering with Indigenous and Native American scientists, conservation agencies and government agencies, the team will focus on manoomin (the Ojibwe word for wild rice), a critical — yet declining — part of the Great Lakes ecosystem and a sacred food that connects Native communities to the land.

Kimberly Marion Suiseeya | Northwestern partners with Indigenous scientists to conserve Great Lakes wetlands

August 29, 2022 – from https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2022/08/northwestern-partners-with-indigenous-scientists-to-conserve-great-lakes-wetlands/
A Northwestern University-led research team has received a $5 million grant over five years from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop new methods to help mitigate the effects of climate change on the Great Lakes and its surrounding natural ecosystems. By partnering with Indigenous and Native American scientists, conservation agencies and government agencies, the team will focus on manoomin (the Ojibwe word for wild rice), a critical — yet declining — part of the Great Lakes ecosystem and a sacred food that connects Native communities to the land.

Michelle Bueno Vasquez

August 25, 2022 – from Political Science Now
Michelle Bueno Vasquez is a Ph.D. candidate in political science and a Master’s candidate in statistics. Michelle’s research explores the development of racial categories transnationally between the United States and Latin America. Her work deals specifically with the export of white supremacist and anti-Black standards through U.S. military occupations in the area and their influence on the political and social development in Latin American nations. She also explores the evolution of Census racial categories, particularly looking at Afro-Latino erasure in statistical methodology. In her dissertation, she examines these themes through the case study of the Dominican Republic and its diaspora in the U.S., providing insights into how Afro-Latinos make sense of their racial identity and Black consciousness in the here and now.

Matthew Lacombe, James Druckman | Guns and Democracy: Anti-System Attitudes, Protest, and Support for Violence Among Pandemic Gun-Buyers

August 24, 2022 – from IPR Working Paper Series
The last decade has given rise to substantial concern about democratic backsliding in the U.S. Manifestations include decreased trust in government, conspiratorial beliefs, contentious protests, and support for political violence. Surprisingly, prior work has not explored how these attitudes and behaviors relate to gun-buying, an action that provides people with the means to challenge the state. The researchers address this topic by focusing on individuals who took part in the unprecedented gun buying surge during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a survey with over 50,000 respondents, they find that— relative to other Americans—pandemic gun buyers are more likely to distrust government, believe in conspiracies, protest, and support political violence. Moreover, the authors find that gun buyers who hold anti-government views and attend protests are especially likely to say they bought guns...

Jahara Matisek | Supporting African Partner States Through European Military Assistance Programmes

August 24, 2022 – from Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies Journal
As the West debates defence spending to counter China and Russia, an affordable approach for constructive influence is possible through advising missions that create Sustainable Development Engineering Corps (SDECs) in militaries throughout Africa. Through interviews and surveys of defence officials, Nils Zimmermann, Ivor Wiltenburg and Jahara Matisek find strong support for using European militaries for cost-effective contributions to Western global force posture by creating and deploying advisor units focused on helping African partner militaries establish SDECs.

Ross Carroll | Announcing the JHI’s 2021 Morris D. Forkosch Book Prize Winner

August 24, 2022 – from Journal of the History of Ideas
Every year, the Journal of the History of Ideas awards the Morris D. Forkosch Prize for the best first book in intellectual history. The winner of the 2021 prize is Ross Carroll, for Uncivil Mirth: Ridicule in Enlightenment Britain, published by Princeton University Press. The judging committee writes: In his compelling and cogent Uncivil Mirth: Ridicule in Enlightenment Britain, Ross Carroll provides a striking historical analysis of debates over the political power and moral force of humor. Across a range of source materials, with insightful close readings balanced by sensitive contextualization, Carroll’s history draws out the potentialities attributed to ridicule. Carroll points to a framework for understanding the historical affordances of ridicule that remains resonant in the present day, contrasting Hobbesian reproofs with the measured embrace associated with Shaftesbury.

Diego Rossello | Detail Radicals: Gothic Feminism, Macho Populism, and the Spectral Body of the Queen

August 21, 2022 – from Political Theology
Bonnie Honig's book, Shell-Shocked: Feminist Criticism after Trump, is a sharp, urgent, and sophisticated critique of Trumpism's many facets. But it is not any kind of critique: it is a feminist critique of Trumpism's policies, gestures, affects, and legacies. Suggestive in Honig's book is the proposal of a specific type of intense sensorial disposition that fem­inist criticism can work with and through; a kind of alternative epistemology of aware­ness where psychic stability and a sense of reality depend upon a heightened attention to detail. Attention to detail links the stories of public writing reunited and reworked in the book. Following the example of Penelope in Homer's Odyssey, who promises to choose a "suitor" after finishing a shroud but gains time by weaving during the day and unweaving at night, Honig finds a loose thread in the fabric of the political and pulls, until the...

James Druckman, Jeremy Levy | Affective polarization in the American public

August 19, 2022 – from Handbook on Politics and Public Opinion (Edward Elgar 2022)
Affective polarization in the United States - the gap between individuals' positive feelings toward their own political party and negative feelings toward the opposing party - has increased markedly in the past two decades. We review recent scholarship on affective polarization, focusing on causes, social and political consequences, and antidotes. This work shows a link between affective polarization and some concerning behaviors such as deleterious reactions to COVID-19. However, connections between affective polarization and dire political outcomes such as democratic backsliding and violence remain unclear. While possible antidotes to affective polarization focus on correcting stereotypes or priming common identities, more work is needed to determine which causes and antidotes apply most directly to political consequences.

James Druckman, Jeremy Levy | Affective polarization in the American public

August 19, 2022 – from Handbook on Politics and Public Opinion (Edward Elgar 2022)
Affective polarization in the United States - the gap between individuals' positive feelings toward their own political party and negative feelings toward the opposing party - has increased markedly in the past two decades. We review recent scholarship on affective polarization, focusing on causes, social and political consequences, and antidotes. This work shows a link between affective polarization and some concerning behaviors such as deleterious reactions to COVID-19. However, connections between affective polarization and dire political outcomes such as democratic backsliding and violence remain unclear. While possible antidotes to affective polarization focus on correcting stereotypes or priming common identities, more work is needed to determine which causes and antidotes apply most directly to political consequences.

Samara Klar | Partisanship and public opinion

August 18, 2022 – from Handbook on Politics and Public Opinion (Edward Elgar 2022)
When considering where public opinion originates--that is , where people's opinions, attitudes, and ideas about politics even come from in the first place--one near-certain factor is their partisanship: in the United States (US), whether they identify as a Democrat, Republican, or Independent, but the phenomenon is evident across the globe as well.

Julieta Suarez-Cao | Chile in the garden of forking paths

August 17, 2022 – from The Clinic
Both campaigns have tried to install that the reforms will continue beyond the result of the plebiscite. However, it is wrong to assume that both scenarios are analogous in terms of the real possibility that these changes will be carried out. The Agreement of November 15, 2019 is clear: if the option to reject the proposal is won, the current Constitution remains in force. This does not prevent a reform process from starting, but it definitely does not ensure it.

Chloe Thurston | The History of Abortion Politics

August 16, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
A recent study by IPR political scientist Chloe Thurston and David Karol of the University of Maryland examines voting records of California state legislators from the 1960s–1990s to understand the growing ties between the Republican Party and the Christian Right and the Democratic Party and feminist organizations. The researchers show how legislators in California, one of the first states to pass legislation dealing with abortion, shifted from voting on abortion issues based on their religious beliefs to aligning with the emerging views of their political parties.

Jennifer Lin | Urban-Rural Differences in Non-Voting Political Behaviors

August 11, 2022 – from Political Research Quarterly
Existing studies on the contemporary U.S. urban-rural divide have neglected its potential role in non-voting political participation. Theoretically, there are mixed expectations: for example, higher social capital in rural areas, alongside a generally older population, suggest rural areas should have greater political participation. Conversely, lower socioeconomic indicators and more physical distance barriers suggest the opposite. Using nationally stratified survey data from the 2018 CCES (N = 61,000) and 2020 CES (N = 60,000), we find that specific participation behaviors do not consistently vary across the urban-rural spectrum, controlling for demographic variables.

Jahara Matisek | The Soft Path to U.S. Hegemony in the 21st Century: An American Brain Drain Policy against Strategic Competitors

August 10, 2022 – from Policy Studies Organization in Global Security and Intelligence Studies
During the four years of the Trump administration, American strategy adopted a provocative realpolitik approach to American power. Trump’s administration was so focused on U.S. nationalism and threats to American identity that domestic immigration policies became viewed as existential threats. With the introduction of great power competition discourse against China and Russia 2017, a renewed U.S. emphasis on conventional military power and traditional warfare ignores the reality of an increasingly globalized, interconnected world. China and Russia have grown their regional spheres of influence while making in-roads elsewhere with asymmetric tools of influence. While debates rage about how to confront China and Russia through projection of military and economic power, we ask: What can the U.S. do in the long-term to out-compete illiberal authoritarian states? ...

Kimberly Marion Suiseeya | NSF Award Winner

August 3, 2022 – from National Science Foundation
This Focused Hub will use a holistic, transdisciplinary approach to untangle the interconnected human, coastal, and climate change issues causing region-wide manoomin decline in the Western Great Lakes. The Hub will advance scientific capacity to measure, understand, and predict changes in coastal wetland ecosystems, focusing on manoomin as a vital sentinel species. Direct partnerships with Native Nations and Communities will affirm local sovereignty over coastal land, water, and ecosystems, and inform resilience decisions at community, tribal, national, state, and regional levels. The Hub will increase coastal community capacity through community engagement, knowledge co-production, and training a new generation of scientists and leaders from currently underrepresented communities in the region.

Thomas Leeper | What Influences Citizen Forecasts? The Effects of Information, Elite Cues, and Social Cues

August 2, 2022 – from Political Behavior
The emergent literature on citizen forecasting suggests that the public, in the aggregate, can often accurately predict the outcomes of elections. However, it is not clear how citizens form judgments about election results or what factors influence individual predictions. Drawing on an original survey experiment conducted during the campaign for the United Kingdom’s Brexit referendum, we provide novel evidence of what influences citizen forecasts in a so-far unexplored context of direct democracy. Specifically, we investigate the effect of voting preferences and political sophistication, in addition to three “exogenous factors” that we manipulate experimentally—i.e., social cues, elite cues and campaign arguments. Our findings indicate that citizens are reasonably accurate in their predictions, with the average forecast being close to the actual result of the referendum.

Javier Burdman | New Book: The Shadow of Totalitarianism: Action, Judgment, and Evil in Politics

August 1, 2022 – from SUNY Press
The Shadow of Totalitarianism develops a new way to think about the problem of evil in politics. Beginning with the commonplace idea that the rise of totalitarianism in the twentieth century marked the emergence of a new form of evil, Javier Burdman finds early seeds of thinking about this form in Immanuel Kant's moral philosophy. Far from being an isolated object of inquiry, evil, Burdman argues, has long shaped and been central to philosophical understandings of political action and judgment. Systematically analyzing the relationship between evil, action, and judgment in the work of Kant, Hannah Arendt, and Jean-François Lyotard, The Shadow of Totalitarianism aligns evil in politics with a desire for moral certainty, hence the emphasis on the need to accept and affirm uncertainty in current ethical theories. The careful philosophical analysis through which Burdman develops this inquiry

Isabella Alcañiz | New Book: The Distributive Politics of Environmental Protection in Latin America and the Caribbean

August 1, 2022 – from Cambridge Elements
The study of environmental politics in Latin America and the Caribbean expands as conflicts stemming from the deterioration of the natural world increase. Yet this scholarship has not generated a broad research agenda similar to the ones that emerged around other key political phenomena. This Element seeks to address the lack of a comprehensive research agenda in Latin American and Caribbean environmental politics and helps integrate the existing, disparate literatures. Drawing from distributive politics, this Element asks who benefits from the appropriation and pollution of the environment, who pays the costs of climate change and environmental degradation, and who gains from the allocation of state protections.

James N. Druckman | Cognitive–motivational mechanisms of political polarization in social-communicative contexts

August 1, 2022 – from Nature Reviews Psychology
Healthy democratic polities feature competing visions of a good society but also require some level of cooperation and institutional trust. Democracy is at risk when citizens become so polarized that an ‘us versus them’ mentality dominates. Despite a vast multidisciplinary literature, no coherent conceptual framework of the microlevel dynamics that increase or decrease polarization has been presented. In this Review, we provide a conceptual framework to integrate scientific knowledge about cognitive–motivational mechanisms that influence political polarization and the social-communicative contexts in which they are enacted. Ego-justifying and group-justifying motives lead individuals to defend their own pre-existing beliefs and those of their in-group, respectively. However, a distinct class of system-justifying motives contributes to asymmetric forms of polarization.

Matthew Nelsen | 2022 APSA Award Winners Announced

August 1, 2022 – from Political Science Now
2022 APSA Award Winners Announced including Northwestern Ph.D., University of Miami Assistant Professor, Matthew Nelsen, named the co-recipient of the E.E. Schattschneider Award for the best dissertation in the field of American government for his dissertation, "Educating for Empowerment: Race, Socialization, and Reimagining Civic Education”

Jacqueline Stevens | Forced Labor? Migrant detainees claim exploitation at corporate-run detention center

August 1, 2022 – from ABA Journal
When Goodluck Nwauzor arrived at the U.S. southern border in May 2016, he hoped his nightmare was over and that the American dream was within reach. Nwauzor, formerly a small business owner in Nigeria, became a target of the violent militant group Boko Haram. When they burned his business and home to the ground, he fled and traveled for six months through South and Central America before arriving at the U.S. border. “I said I would like to have asylum,” Nwauzor would later testify in court. “I believe my life will be safe if I find myself in America.” Instead, he was detained in a center in Tacoma, Washington. It was there he found himself cleaning showers for the 50-60 other migrants in his pod seven days a week, earning only $1 a day.

Aditi Malik | The role of media in a Kenyan election: what you should know

August 1, 2022 – from The Conversation
Traditionally, political debates have been shaped by mainstream media. Kenya’s mainstream media, however, remain strongly wedded to factional ethnic and class interests. This has undermined their capacity to facilitate fair and open debate, most evidently during elections. Social media platforms have exploited this trust deficit, acting as important alternative sites for political deliberation. But they have also become powerful tools for disinformation and misinformation.

July

Kimberly Marion Suiseeya | Faculty advance critical work during Summer Writing Retreat

July 27, 2022 – from Northwestern Office of the Provost
Assistant Professor of Political Science Kimberly Marion Suiseeya similarly has made significant progress on revising a chapter of her book manuscript on environmental politics and Indigenous communities. “What I needed was protected time and space—two things I could not access in these last two-plus years,” she said. “Thus far, this retreat has provided what I needed most to reset productivity in my work. I didn’t imagine I could actually finish my revisions on this chapter this week, yet now I see the end in sight.”

Loubna El Amine & Kevin Mazur | Thinking about Groups in Political Science: A Case for Bringing the Meso Level Back In

July 24, 2022 – from Political Science Quarterly
THE STUDY OF GROUPS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE has been transformed by the critique of essentialism: groups cannot be discussed as clearly bounded, homogenous, and impermeable. This is evident in the established status of constructivism and instrumentalism in the study of ethnicity in comparative politics, and in the existence of a debate about whether cultures exist and how they should be identified in political theory. The critique of essentialism has immensely improved the study of groups, banishing lazy assumptions about value consensuses or other psychological dispositions existing across entire societies. Yet many of the claims that flow out of this critique—namely, that individuals can easily move in and out of groups, changing allegiance according to their self-interest, and that groups are constantly in flux—are not entirely unproblematic. The persistence of groups, the attachment ...

Jennifer Forestal | Of Humans, Machines, and Extremism: The Role of Platforms in Facilitating Undemocratic Cognition

July 24, 2022 – from American Behavioral Scientist
The events surrounding the 2020 U.S. election and the January 6 insurrection have challenged scholarly understanding of concepts like collective action, radicalization, and mobilization. In this article, we argue that online far-right radicalization is better understood as a form of distributed cognition, in which the groups’ online environment incentivizes certain patterns of behavior over others. Namely, these platforms organize their users in ways that facilitate a nefarious form of collective intelligence, which is amplified and strengthened by systems of algorithmic curation. In short, these platforms reflect and facilitate undemocratic cognition, fueled by affective networks, contributing to events like the January 6 insurrection and far-right extremism more broadly. To demonstrate, we apply this framing to a case study (the “Stop the Steal” movement) to illustrate how this ...

Loubna El Amine | Flip the disjoncteur

July 24, 2022 – from London Review of Books: LRB Blog
One morning soon after we arrived in Beirut this summer the state-supplied electricity came on at seven and stayed on. It was still on at eight, still on at nine, still on at ten, still on at eleven. We did a few rounds of laundry; we even ran the dryer. We turned on the air conditioners and could not bring ourselves to turn them off even when the house got cold. The electricity was still on when we left at noon. It was out by the time we returned from lunch and never came back for more than an hour a day in the weeks that followed. ‘Why is the light out?’ our toddler asks. Because there is no electricity, we tell him. Why is there no electricity? Because in Lebanon sometimes there is no electricity. Why? Because there is no state, I say, only half joking. Why? We prod him down the stairs. He has taken to chanting in Arabic ‘the state has come,’ shorthand for the state-supplied...

Laurel Harbridge-Yong | Measuring the Effectiveness of Public Leaders

July 23, 2022 – from Tommy G. Thompson Center on Public Leadership
What makes a legislator effective? The Thompson Center presents a virtual event that explores the elements of measuring legislative success. Featuring a panel of five speakers, each will share their expertise on lawmaking, followed by audience Q&A. Craig Volden is Co-Director of the Center for Effective Lawmaking and a Professor of Public Policy and Politics at the University of Virginia. Laurel Harbridge-Yong is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and a Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. Beatriz Rey is a SNF Agora Visiting Fellow at Johns Hopkins University and an APSA Congressional Fellow (2021-2022) working at the U.S. House of Representatives. Jeffery Mondak is the James M. Benson Chair in Public Issues and Civic Leadership in the Department of Political Science at the University of Illinois. Walter Stone...

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd | The ‘wall’ between church and state is blocking our view on abortion rights

July 21, 2022 – from Chicago Tribune
The Supreme Court’s Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decision has reignited fears among liberals and progressives of the fall of the wall between church and state. Yet the wall of separation is only a metaphor, and a tired and strained one at that. When people try to defend access to abortion by trying to keep religion out, they are assuming a lot about religion. If religion were cordoned off from public life, they say, democracy and equality would flourish. This is a deeply flawed story. First, a majority of Americans, across traditions, support access to safe abortion. A recent Pew Research Center survey found that 61% of Americans say abortion should be legal in all or most circumstances. More than half of U.S. Catholics favor legal abortion, a 2019 Pew Research Center survey found.

Salih Emre Gerçek | The “Social Question” as a Democratic Question: Louis Blanc's Organization of Labor

July 18, 2022 – from Modern Intellectual History
Recent studies have identified the revival of the idea of democracy in early nineteenth-century French thought. This article recovers one important reason behind this revival: democracy became a response to another debate that emerged during that period—the “social question.” Although not well known in the English-speaking world, Louis Blanc was one of the most important socialist figures during the July Monarchy in France. Examining Blanc's Organization of Labor, this article shows how Blanc mobilized democracy to challenge the July Monarchy's exclusionary representative government and its reduction of the “social question” to pauperism. Blanc argued that industrial competition created a system of domination and proposed democratic reorganization of labor as a way to promote the common good. Blanc reformulated the “social question” as a democratic question, arguing that poverty ...

Daniel Krcmaric | I’ll Be Back? Exiled Leaders and Political Instability

July 18, 2022 – from Journal of Conflict Resolution
Exile is often considered a useful political solution that can coax violent or unpopular leaders out of power. But these “golden parachutes” may come with a price. Specifically, do exiled leaders increase instability back in their home countries? In this paper, we outline the mechanisms through which exiled rulers can destabilize their home state’s politics and ultimately increase conflict. We present two types of evidence to support the argument. The first is a cross-national analysis that uses our original Leaders in Exile dataset to examine how exiled leaders shape the likelihood of civil conflicts, coups, and protests. The second is a cross-leader analysis designed to minimize inferential concerns by comparing cases where leaders escape into exile with cases where leaders are killed. In both tests, we find that exiled leaders are linked to political instability ...

Sally A. Nuamah | New Research Grants Approved by the Russell Sage Foundation

July 15, 2022 – from Russel Sage Foundation
Sally Nuamah (Northwestern University) will examine how experiences with the criminal justice system impacts political participation among Black women. Grants were made in our four core programs and our special initiative on Immigration and Immigrant Integration.

Daniel J. Galvin & Chloe N. Thurston | American Political Development as a Problem-Driven Enterprise

July 14, 2022 – from Studies in American Political Development
"We argue that American political development's (APD's) relentless preoccupation with the substantive problems that shape and animate American politics and how they emerge and develop over time has been a key source of the subfield's durability. We elaborate on three main payoffs to conceptualizing APD as a problem-driven enterprise: (1) it highlights APD's main comparative advantage within the American politics subfield, noting the tremendous agility APD's substantive breadth lends the enterprise; (2) it resolves the methodological debate, granting simply that the question chooses the method rather than the other way around; and (3) it reorients the critique: simply because a subfield considers itself to be problem-oriented does not mean that it is identifying the right problems to study."

James N. Druckman | Do state abortion policies represent citizen views?

July 13, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
“The public’s opinions on abortion are certainly nuanced — their opposition to no access under any circumstance is very clear, but they also support restrictions based on viability,” said political scientist James Druckman, one of the consortium researchers. “This makes it a complicated issue with limited mobilizational capacity for the Democrats. The bulk of Democrats live in states that have laws consistent with their preferences and it is unlikely Republicans in states with highly restrictive laws would shift their voting patterns due to the issue.”

Ana Arjona | The Lasting Mark of Shootings

July 8, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
IPR experts detail the sweeping effects on survivors and communities—and discuss policies to help prevent them. Beyond lifetime career and mental health consequences, research shows that a school shooting can also shift how people vote in communities where one occurred. Political scientist and IPR associate Ana Arjona and her colleagues, Laura García-Montoya (PhD 2020) and Matthew Lacombe (PhD 2019), investigate how. “When we think about debates about what can be done to reduce school shootings, political action is very important, especially as polarization grows in the country,” Arjona said. “Looking at school shootings allows you to try to understand how people respond to a very particular form of violence.”

Jonathan Schulman | Winners and losers: the psychology of foreign trade. By Diana C Mutz. Princeton: Princeton University. 2021. 360pp. £74.00.

July 5, 2022 – from International Affairs
Most Americans do not work in industries threatened by foreign imports, nor are they aware of the economic benefits of free trade or of how different trade policies can affect their lives. Despite this, Americans do have opinions on trade and, in many cases, strong ones. Diana Mutz reconciles these seemingly paradoxical observations, arguing that Americans are not motivated by economic self-interest. Instead, many see trade as an arena for global competition and equate trade between states to their own interpersonal relationships. The result is a host of trade preferences that are more nuanced than most economic theories acknowledge.

Anthony S. Chen | CHAT Professionalization: On Being and Becoming a Historical Sociologist

July 1, 2022 – from Comparative Historical Analysis and Theory
A panel discussion on life as a historical sociologist, featuring Maryam Alemzadeh, Tony Chen, Lis Clemens, Marisela Martinez-Cola, Chris Muller, and Angel Adams Parham. Comparative Historical Analysis and Theory, also known as CHAT (yes — we’re really proud of the acronym!), provides a space for continued conversation between SSHA and ASA.

June

Jordan Gans-Morse | Selective Bribery: When Do Citizens Engage in Corruption? (WP-22-28)

June 30, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research: Working Paper Series
Corruption often persists not only because public officials take bribes, but also because many citizens are willing to pay them. Yet even in countries with endemic corruption, few people always pay bribes. Why do citizens bribe in some situations but not in others? Integrating insights from both principal-agent and collective action approaches to the study of corruption, the authors develop an analytical framework for understanding selective bribery. Their framework reveals how citizens’ motivations, costs, and risks influence their willingness to engage in corruption. A conjoint experiment conducted in Ukraine in 2020 provides substantial corroboration for 10 of 11 pre-registered predictions. By shedding light on conditions that dampen citizens’ readiness to pay bribes, the researchers’ findings offer insights into the types of institutional reforms that may reduce corruption.

Lucien Ferguson | From Love to Care: Arendt’s Amor Mundi in the Ethical Turn

June 30, 2022 – from Political Theory
This article offers a novel account of a key concept in Hannah Arendt’s political thought: amor mundi. In political theory’s ethical turn, theorists have increasingly turned to amor mundi as a source of ethical guidance and inspiration for politics. However, in doing so, they have elided Arendt’s distinct understanding of care. This article recovers Arendt’s understanding of amor mundi as care for the world by reconstructing the central concerns of her dissertation, Der Liebesbegriff bei Augustin, and tracing them to the “Crisis” essays of Between Past and Future. It shows that amor mundi emerges in the dissertation as part of a question: if love is our fundamental orientation toward the world, how can we love the world without instrumentalizing it? The two “Crisis” essays provide the following answer: if love is to avoid—and perhaps militate against—the instrumentalization of the ...

Tabitha Bonilla | Promises Kept, Promises Broken, and Those Caught in the Middle

June 30, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
"Investigations into how promises matter to voters, whether during campaigns for a new office or when running for reelection, reveal that voters have a nuanced understanding of promises that is dependent on assessments of candidate attentions as well as the successful policy interventions. Bonilla builds on that work and the long literature on motivated reasoning to examine how voters use partisanship in their decisions of promise fulfillment. With two original survey experiments, she demonstrates that voters view promise fulfillment through a partisan lens when an issue is a partisan issue, and particularly when there is ambiguity around if the promise is kept. This finding suggests nuance to the traditional assumptions around how promise fulfillment is assessed in reelection campaigns."

Ari Shaw | What Anti-LGBT Politics in the U.S. Means for Democracy at Home and Abroad

June 29, 2022 – from New America
On March 28, Gov. Ron DeSantis signed legislation that effectively bans discussion of sexual orientation and gender identity in Florida’s schools. The so-called “Don’t Say Gay” bill creates new restrictions on classroom speech around LGBT people and same-sex families, and empowers parents to sue a school if the policy is violated, chilling any talk of LGBT themes lest schools or teachers face potentially costly litigation.

Silvia Otero Bahamon | ¿QUIÉN VOTÓ POR QUIÉN Y EN DÓNDE? SEGUNDA PARTE: ANÁLISIS DE LA SEGUNDA VUELTA

June 22, 2022 – from La Silla Llena
Recién empieza a asentarse el resultado electoral del pasado domingo 19 de junio. Gustavo Petro Urrego logró ser elegido presidente, con el 50,4 % de los votos válidos. Rodolfo Hernández obtuvo en 47,3 %. En vísperas de la segunda vuelta, muchos cuestionaban la capacidad que podría tener Petro de crecer, pues se asumía que casi la totalidad de los votos de las opciones que perdieron en primera vuelta podrían ir a Hernández. No obstante, Petro logró vencer las proyecciones de la simple aritmética electoral.

Jordan Gans-Morse | Is Russia’s wartime propaganda more powerful than family bonds?

June 20, 2022 – from The Washington Post
In Russia, an estimated 11 million people have relatives in Ukraine. With so many family ties connecting the two countries, why haven’t more Russians risen up against Russia’s brutal war on Ukraine? According to recent news stories, the answer partly is that many Russians believe President Vladimir Putin’s propaganda narratives over their own kin’s firsthand accounts. Are these headline-grabbing accounts isolated incidents, or do they represent broader trends? Are Russian and Ukrainian relatives still communicating? If so, have some Ukrainians pierced the veil of Russian propaganda, at least with their family members?

Laura Garcia Montoya | Techos rotos de la segunda vuelta

June 19, 2022 – from Razon Publica
Gustavo Petro recibió más de 11 millones de votos y a Rodolfo Hernández no le alcanzó. Aunque el domingo 29 de mayo varios analistas se apresuraron a concluir que Petro había perdido (otra vez) la oportunidad de ser elegido presidente, el rápido crecimiento de Hernández en la primera vuelta no sobrevivió al escrutinio del tiempo.

James Druckman | Depressive Symptoms and Conspiracy Beliefs (WP-22-22)

June 17, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research: Working Paper Series
Conspiratorial beliefs can endanger individuals and societies by increasing the likelihood of harmful behaviors such as political violence and the flouting of public health guidelines. While scholars have identified various correlates of conspiracy beliefs, one factor that has received scant attention is depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms may be associated with a loss of control that conspiracy beliefs can counter by providing an antidote to uncertainty and distress. This relationship between depression and conspiratorial thinking, however, likely depends on other individual and situational factors. The researchers use three large surveys to document the connection between depression and conspiracy beliefs. While a relationship consistently exists, its extent depends on other factors: Variables that lead to an additional loss of control (e.g., illness) strengthen the ...

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd | Northwestern faculty available on upcoming Supreme Court rulings

June 17, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
“The idea that it is a ‘religious’ issue is relatively new. Some trace it to the rise of the religious right in the 1970s and ’80s. But concern and fear about women’s autonomy and its societal and even biological consequences can be traced back much further in American history, as Marie Griffiths shows in her book “Moral Combat: How Sex Divided American Christians and Fractured American Politics.” Griffiths tracks these concerns to the rise of the anti-suffrage movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The bottom line is that these are both secular and religious questions. The idea that it is either/or is a distraction.”

Dan Galvin | Union organizers debate ‘Workers Rights Amendment’ as November vote draws near

June 16, 2022 – from The Daily Northwestern
Political science Prof. Daniel Galvin, who specializes in worker’s rights and labor politics, said the unionization process is “littered with obstacles” and “favors the employer at every turn.” About 90% of workers do not have collective bargaining abilities, Galvin said, preventing employee negotiations. “Low-wage workers are probably the ones who are most in need of rights and protections,” Galvin said. “They’re the ones who have turned to these small community-based organizations to recreate the kind of substantive rights that you might have otherwise gotten through collective bargaining agreements.”

Brian Harrison | Ties that Bind: The Effects of Transgender Contact on Transphobia

June 14, 2022 – from Journal of Homosexuality
Allport’s Theory of Interpersonal Contact suggests that coming into contact with a member of an outgroup should increase support for that outgroup. Previous studies find mixed results when applying Allport’s theory to reported contact with transgender people. We posit that this is due to imprecise and aggregated measures of contact and a lack of attention to the differences between contact that is ephemeral or ongoing and voluntary or obligatory. We explore our theories with data from a large, high-quality survey conducted in early 2020. We find that while various forms of contact (including voluntary and obligatory) predict warmer ratings on feeling thermometers, only close personal friendships—contact that is voluntary and ongoing—predicts attitudes toward transgender-inclusive policies.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | Congressional hearings make for historic moments, but their ultimate impact varies

June 12, 2022 – from USA Today
The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol riots opened with a highly orchestrated, prime-time event on Thursday that was watched by 20 million viewers, but history has shown that some of the most memorable hearings don't always produce lasting results. While congressional hearings have led to watershed moments in U.S. history, these hearings will address new subject matter for the nation, including accusations that a defeated president orchestrated an attack on the Capitol to overturn election results.

Julieta Suarez-Cao | What they call universalism is masculine identity politics

June 10, 2022 – from The Clinic
For some years we have been hearing criticism that the left has been left alone with “ identity ” issues and has abandoned the “ universalist ” flags of the 20th century. This is not the exclusive heritage of Chile, the same claims are heard in all the countries of the region, in the United States and in several European countries. According to those who are nostalgic for “universalist” politics, when the left stopped talking to the workers and began to deal with feminist , environmentalist, sexual dissidence , indigenous people demands, that is, “post-material identity” demands, it lost north and the possibility of speaking for the needs of the whole world.

Aditi Malik | Ending Gender-Based Violence: Justice and Community in South Africa. By Hannah E. Britton. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2020. 216p. $110.00 cloth, $24.95 paper.

June 9, 2022 – from Perspectives on Politics
Despite its progressive constitution, gender-based violence remains a pervasive problem in post-apartheid South Africa. In this poignantly written book, Hannah Britton provides a powerful intersectional framework to account for this troubling reality. Fundamentally, her research holds that the carceral approach to addressing gender-based violence—with its focus on criminalizing and incarcerating perpetrators—has proved to be inadequate because it has helped the state eschew accountability for protecting all citizens. Shifting attention away from individual-level solutions, Ending Gender-Based Violence develops a novel community-level analysis. This analysis helps explain both the endurance of violence against women in the post-apartheid era and offers solutions to address the root causes of such violence.

Kevin Mazur | Response to Justin Schon’s Review of Revolution in Syria: Identity, Networks, and Repression

June 9, 2022 – from Perspectives on Politics
The up-close view of the Syrian case suggests, as Justin Schon surmises, the enormous difficulty of sustaining a broad coalitional challenge to a regime that rules through a patchwork of alliances and instrumentalizes ethnic identity. My book dwells on pre-uprising techniques of governance because decisions taken in the moment of contention are so often heavily constrained by the networks and resources available to incumbents ruling in this manner. The question of uniting diverse segments of the population also hangs over attempts to build new governance arrangements out of the wreckage of civil wars in these polities; the hope is that understanding the historical exigencies that sustained such patchworks before revolution, as well as the processes that undid them, will contribute to building more equitable and durable arrangements for the future. However, the trajectory of the ...

Kevin Mazur | Surviving the War in Syria: Survival Strategies in a Time of Conflict. By Justin Schon.

June 9, 2022 – from Perspectives on Politics
In Surviving the War in Syria, Justin Schon examines the ways that civilians safeguard themselves and aid others during civil wars. Focusing on the ongoing civil war in Syria, the book discusses a wide range of “survival strategies” that civilians undertake and examines empirical variation in two of them: the timing of civilian migration outside the country and the extent to which civilians provide “community support”, material or emotional assistance to other civilians. The book proceeds from the astute observation that there is no direct, mechanical relationship between the level of violence an individual witnesses or is subjected to and that individual’s propensity to migrate or provide aid—instead, a host of structural and situational factors mediate these outcomes. To explain this variation, Schon introduces both “motivation” and “opportunity” factors, operating at the societal ...

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | A preview of the Jan. 6 committee hearings

June 9, 2022 – from WBEZ Chicago
After nearly a year of investigating the Jan. 6 attack, the House select committee will Prime-time hearings of the Jan. 6 committee begin Thursday night. Reset checks in with experts to discuss what to expect and where we go from here.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. & Jaime Dominguez | ‘There is no doubt that the hearings will scandalize the nation,’ expert says

June 7, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
“The primetime hearing scheduled by the House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is likely to break new ground in terms of what we know about the high-level planning and execution of the Republican Party’s attempt to steal the 2020 presidential election. “Given what we know from press reports, it will likely cast light on the role that several high-ranking members of Congress played in the events and give us some insight into precisely what Donald Trump was doing in the White House as the insurrection unfolded. There is no doubt that the hearings will scandalize the nation. The problem is that the hearings on their own will not save our Democracy. Not only have the GOP embarked on a dangerous path of denying that the insurrection ever happened, but they are continuing to plot and organize to steal subsequent elections."

Silvia Otero-Bahamon | El votante anti-establecimiento de la región andina

June 4, 2022 – from Vanguardia
En las elecciones de 2022 la escisión maestra de la política colombiana cambió. En vez de dividirnos frente a qué hacer con el conflicto, el país se dividió alrededor de tres ejes: petrismo vs. anti-petrismo, uribismo vs. anti-uribismo, y establecimiento vs. anti-establecimiento. Los candidatos escogieron distintas esquinas en ese cubo imaginario que combina los tres ejes para construir su base electoral fuerte. Petro obtiene la mayoría de sus votos de la esquina del anti-establecimiento-antiuribismo-petrismo y Rodolfo Hernández tiene su base de votantes en la esquina anti-establecimiento-antiuribista-anti petrista.

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd & Ely Orrego Torres | Global Challenges of Secularism and Religious Freedom

June 3, 2022 – from Otros Cruces
When the COVID-19 pandemic hit globally, Otros Cruces began a virtual training program studying two books on secularism and religious freedom written by the outstanding scholar Elizabeth Shakman Hurd, a Professor at Northwestern University. We interviewed her, and she shared with us her main contributions in the disciplines of political science, religious studies, and the social sciences based on her research on global religion and politics.This booklet consists of the transcription and translation into Spanish of the interview conducted in English. It is a valuable work because, on the one hand, it is a pioneering unpublished work of Elizabeth Shakman Hurd in Spanish. In addition, we expect that this book will be the first of a series of writings delving into her contributions. On the other hand, this book represents the beginning of a dialogue about the problematics of religion and pol

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | California Panel Recommends Reparations For Black Residents

June 2, 2022 – from Newsy
The panel is also recommending programs to get Black people registered to vote and keep them on the voter rolls; programs to repay Black land and business owners for value lost in racial terror; programs to get students free tuition; and programs to house vulnerable populations. Plus, the panel wants lawmakers to allow incarcerated people to vote, make mental health care and rehabilitation a first priority for inmates and pay them for their work while in prison.

May

Ariel Zellman | With Friends Like These: Does American Soft Power Advance International Religious Freedom?

May 31, 2022 – from Religions
"The International Religious Freedom Act, passed by Congress in 1998, set international religious freedom promotion (IRF) as a core objective of American foreign policy. Although formally empowering the president to enact punitive sanctions in instances of extreme religious repression, IRF is primarily a soft power instrument, with the expressed intent to persuade rather than coerce states into greater respect for religious freedom. Nearly a quarter century since its enactment, however, religious discrimination has markedly increased worldwide. This paper therefore seeks to quantitatively evaluate the extent to which American soft power, measured via levels of popular approval for the United States in countries surveyed by various polling agencies from 2002 to 2014, has correlated with shifts in governmental religious discrimination (GRD) since 1998. We find that not only do higher level

Silvia Otero Bahamon | Who voted for Whom and Where? Data Analysis of the 2022 First Round

May 31, 2022 – from La Silla Llena
"The recent first-round elections held on Sunday, May 29, brought several surprises. In this text we analyze some trends based on the municipal results obtained by the different candidates. The conclusion is that the election is tight and that both campaigns must establish differentiated strategies for each territory if they want to win."

Kumar Ramanathan | Reinvigorating American Political Development Scholarship through Du Bois's Black Reconstruction

May 30, 2022 – from Studies in American Political Development
Recent events have augured a renewed urgency among political scientists to address the instability of democracy and the structure of racism in the United States. In this article, I make the case for American political development (APD) scholars to engage more deeply with Black Reconstruction in America (1935), W. E. B. Du Bois's masterful study of political development during the Reconstruction Era. This rich text, which analyzes an often overlooked period in the APD literature, offers numerous contributions that can reinvigorate our analyses of democracy and racism in the United States.

Tabitha Bonilla | How Source Cues Shape Evaluations of Group-Based Derogatory Political Messages

May 29, 2022 – from Journal of Politics
Theories of social norms suggest that, except for prejudiced people, individuals should reject racially derogatory speech. The increase of derogation in politics, including byi ngroup members, suggests more complexity. We argue that source cues shape the application of norms. Specifically, group membership of the observer and that of the speaker are critical to understanding how norms manifest in politics. We test this theory in four experimental studies that compare the reactions of White and Black respondents to White, Black, and Muslim candidates. We find that both Black andWhite Americans punish White candidates who derogate Blacks or Muslims."

Matthew Lacombe | Why gun control feels out of reach — and why there’s still hope

May 27, 2022 – from Vox
It’s also a reminder of how little has changed since then to enact meaningful gun control legislation. In fact, if anything, gun laws around the country have become radically more permissive: Since 2020, 24 states have passed extreme permitless carry laws, with more likely to follow, despite strong resistance from law enforcement, the public, and gun safety advocates — and despite research suggesting that more permissive laws lead to more gun violence.

Karen Alter | How to change the operating system of global capitalism: A rejoinder

May 26, 2022 – from International Journal of Constitutional Law
From Colonial to Multilateral International Law: A Global Capitalism and Law Investigation employed a very unusual research strategy.1 I drew on the global histories of others to explore the interaction between the shift from a colonial to multilateral system of international lawmaking and the practices of global firms, seeking to identify how the operation of global capitalism has shaped international law during and across the colonial and multilateral eras. Instead of accepting the idea that international law consists of agreements between states, and that the world of law is divided between international and domestic law, I explored histories of law in colonial times, and the practices that firms have used to legally defend their operations in different parts of the world. Following John Ruggie, I defined principled multilateralism as a twentieth-century mode of international politics

Kim Marion Suiseeya | Rethinking and Upholding Justice and Equity in Transformative Biodiversity Governance

May 26, 2022 – from Cambridge University Press
"Justice and equity are fundamental to the complex choices that societies need to make to achieve transformative change (Bennett et al., 2019; IPBES, 2019; Leach et al., 2018; Martin, 2017). Evidence that more socioeconomically unequal societies tend to experience higher rates of biodiversity loss (Holland et al., 2009; IPBES, 2019) suggests that injustice and threats to biodiversity are closely intertwined. Injustice can function as an underlying cause of biodiversity loss, such as where colonial expropriation of Indigenous peoples’ land paves the way for its exploitation (Martinez-Alier, 2002)."

Swati Srivastava | The Algorithms Are Thinking About You Right Now

May 23, 2022 – from Humanities: The Magazine of the National Endowment for the Humanities
Algorithms are the computational rules behind technologies like GPS navigation, online search, and content streaming. Previously, algorithms were designed by programmers who defined their rulesets. Today, machine learning also makes it possible for algorithms, immersed in large datasets, to develop their own rules. Machine learning may be supervised by training algorithms or left unsupervised to operate with fewer cues. For instance, a handwriting-detection algorithm may learn by being trained on a database of pre-labeled handwritten images or through immersion in a database where the algorithm clusters images based on its own pattern identification.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | ‘In Georgia, Mr. Trump is very likely to face his largest rebuke’ expert says

May 23, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
“Tomorrow’s primary contest in Georgia will be yet another test of former President Donald Trump’s power to shape the fortunes of Republican candidates in the current cycle. Mr. Trump has had a mixed record in the current cycle. His endorsement of J.D. Vance in the Ohio Senate primary is his big win thus far. In other states, however, Mr. Trump’s endorsement has proven to be far less powerful than anyone would have predicted going into the cycle."

Ariel Zellman | Mobilizing the White: White Nationalism and Congressional Politics in the American South

May 20, 2022 – from American Politics Research
The past decade has seen a dramatic rise in the public profile of white nationalism in the United States. Invigorated by the 2008 election of President Barack Obama and coalescing with the election of President Donald Trump in 2016, this period was marked by a substantial uptick in far-right hate crimes, white nationalist rallies, marches, protests, and online activities, and increasing polarization of the voting public, marked particularly by white resentment regarding perceived status decline. While these phenomena are closely correlated, white nationalist groups (WNGs) are typically regarded as symptoms of such resentments rather than social movements that may contribute to tangible political outcomes.

Rachel Moskowitz | Educational equality in the twenty-first century: white voter conflict over integration and community control

May 19, 2022 – from Politics, Groups, and Identities
Using an original survey experiment, this paper explores voter preference formation on competing dimensions of educational equality. In March 2012, residents of Evanston, IL voted on a ballot referendum that would levy taxes earmarked for building a new school in a historically Black neighborhood that has not had a neighborhood school since racial integration of the school district in the late 1960s. Competing visions of equality as either integration or community control were at the heart of the Evanston referendum debate; maintaining city-wide racial integration of all schools was pitted against providing equal access for all to a local school in their own neighborhood. This paper specifically focuses on how white voters, who often hold undue influence in education policy-making, form their preferences on an issue that has a significant racial impact. I find that priming and ...

Laurel Harbridge-Yong | MAGA was the real winner of the Ohio Republican primary

May 13, 2022 – from The Washington Post
Karl Rove argued that Trump’s influence was limited, noting that almost 68 percent of Ohio's Republican voters “ignored or rejected” Trump’s endorsement by voting for other candidates. But totaling the votes for MAGA-style candidates — Vance, Josh Mandel and Mike Gibbons — shows that the Trump brand is tops in the Ohio GOP. Together, Vance and Mandel, the second-place finisher, combined for 56 percent of Republican voters. Add the 12 percent of voters who picked Gibbons, and two-thirds of all Republican primary voters pulled levers for MAGA.

Lena Trabucco | Danske våben til Ukraine rejser juridiske problemer

May 10, 2022 – from Berlingske
Danmark har i de seneste måneder taget betydelige skridt for at hjælpe Ukraine med at forsvare sig selv over for Rusland. Først besluttede den danske regering at sende 2.700 antitank-missiler til det ukrainske militær. For nylig meddelte regeringen så, at Danmark vil øge våbenhjælpen til Ukraine med 600 millioner kroner samt forskellige former for pansrede mandskabsvogne.

S.R. Gubitz | Race, Gender, and the Politics of Incivility: How Identity Moderates Perceptions of Uncivil Discourse

May 10, 2022 – from Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Politics
Many Americans agree that incivility in politics is a problem and has been one for a long time (Herbst Reference Herbst2010). Many speak of incivility as a singular concept; that is, a set of words and phrases that apparently “everyone” knows have no place in good democratic governance. Recent work has found systematic variation in what people perceive as uncivil. I argue that these variations stem not only from partisan reasoning but perhaps more importantly from stereotypes about race and gender, indicating that incivility itself is an identity-laden construct for most Americans.

Laura Garcia Montoya | "LOS DATOS MUESTRAN QUE ES CUESTIONABLE QUE LA IZQUIERDA ALCANZÓ SU TECHO"

May 9, 2022 – from La Silla Académica
Porque es muy probable que a la segunda vuelta de las presidenciales de este año llegue Gustavo Petro a enfrentarse con el candidato de la derecha, Federico Gutiérrez, muchos han visto en esta elección una proyección de lo que el país vivió hace cuatro años. En ese entonces, Petro fue derrotado por el hasta entonces desconocido Iván Duque, quien ganó en gran parte por ser la antítesis del candidato de izquierda. ¿Pero qué tanto pueden pensarse las presidenciales de 2022 como un 2018 recargado?

Andrene Wright | Black motherhood shapes leadership in unique ways

May 6, 2022 – from The Washington Post
As we celebrate Mother’s Day, it’s worth noting the challenges that motherhood brings. Many mothers are struggling to make parenting decisions amid changing coronavirus protocols, such as assessing travel risks after a Florida federal judge struck down the mask mandate for planes and other transportation. In the United States, many mothers are fearful of the continued threat to reproductive rights for themselves and their children, given the recently leaked draft of a Supreme Court opinion on abortion.

Mneesha Gellman | Unsettling Settler-Colonialism in Words and Land: A Case Study of Far Northern California

May 5, 2022 – from International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies
This article looks at two case studies of unsettling settler-colonialism in the far north of California: the inclusion of Yurok language electives in public high school, and land return to the Wiyot Tribe. These two cases demonstrate repertoires of Indigenous resistance to historic and ongoing culturecide—the killing of culture—and show what unsettling settler-colonialism looks like in the region. I argue that each of these two events—acts of Indigenous voice-raising and place-making— constitute forms of resistance to ongoing erasure of Indigenous peoples in settler-colonized spaces. Concretely, both Yurok language course inclusion in public schools, and land return of Duluwat Island to the Wiyot Tribe disrupt patterns of culturecide and promote new kinds of settler-Indigenous relations in the region.

James Druckman & Robin Bayes | Studying Science Inequities: How to Use Surveys to Study Diverse Populations

May 5, 2022 – from The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Scientists in the United States have made transformative discoveries that have improved societal well-being. Yet the United States also has a long, unsettling history of unequal access to these advances. This unequal access exacerbates disparate impacts of science-related phenomena, such as climate change and COVID-19, on vulnerable populations. In part, these problems are intensified by the fact that retrospective research that documents inequities is far more prevalent than prospective research that studies differences among groups.

Robin Bayes | Moral Convictions and Threats to Science

May 5, 2022 – from The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
On the other hand, people do not simply believe whatever they wish to believe. On most scientific topics, public beliefs reflect the best available science and are not significantly polarized (Kahan 2015; McPhetres, Bago, and Pennycook 2019). Furthermore, the public has largely maintained a high level of confidence in the scientific community over time (Druckman, this volume). Therefore, the phenomena just described are not universal, and understanding the factors and conditions that aggravate them is a key step in assessing the corresponding threat to science.

James Druckman | Threats to Science: Politicization, Misinformation, and Inequalities

May 5, 2022 – from The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
The scientific enterprise leads a precarious existence. It produces systematized knowledge that constitutes an unrivaled information source on which to base decisions. Yet science also incentivizes criticism, cannot provide definitive proof, and is practiced by a relatively small, homogenous group of experts. These latter features make science vulnerable to threats that undermine its usefulness. These threats include the misappropriation of science for reasons orthogonal to the creation of knowledge (specifically, political motivations), misinformation where inaccurate claims appear in the guise of science, and inequalities of representation in the scientific enterprise that can lead to flawed epistemology and group disenfranchisement.

Kim Suiseeya, Alex Anderson & Katie Moffitt, | Waking from Paralysis: Revitalizing Conceptions of Climate Knowledge and Justice for More Effective Climate Action

May 5, 2022 – from The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Despite decades of climate science research, existing climate actions have had limited impacts on mitigating climate change. Efforts to reduce emissions, for example, have yet to spur sufficient action to reduce the most severe effects of climate change. We draw from our experiences as Ojibwe knowledge holders and community members, scientists, and scholars to demonstrate how the lack of recognition of traditional knowledges (TK) within climate science constrains effective climate action and exacerbates climate injustice.

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd | Overturning Roe v. Wade is ‘about control, not religion’ expert says

May 4, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
According to a leaked draft opinion obtained by Politico, the U.S. Supreme Court is poised to overturn Roe v. Wade. Northwestern University has four political and legal experts available to discuss the historical and legal context of the potential decision and what it would mean for the future of abortion rights and the Court’s interpretation of the protections guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment.

Moses Khisa, Christopher Day, Jahara Matisek, Will Reno, Erin Damman | Rethinking Civil-Military Relations in Africa: Beyond the Coup d’État

May 1, 2022 – from Lynne Rienner Publishers
Though Africa historically has been the site of countless military coups d’état, civil-military relations across the continent have changed dramatically in recent years. What do these changes say about the military's ongoing role in Africa's political and social institutions? How useful are conventional models for understanding civil-military relations in the African context? The authors of Rethinking Civil-Military Relations in Africa address these questions, exploring the nature and significance of evolving relationships between political authority, military power, and society.

April

Lena Trabucco | Beyond the Ban: Comparing the Ability of "Killer Robots" and Human Soldiers to Comply with IHL

April 21, 2022 – from The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs
Much of the legal debate over the use of autonomous weapons systems (AWS) focuses on whether AWS are capable of respecting basic principles of international humanitarian law (IHL). In one camp are the “techno-pessimists”: scholars who insist that AWS are not and never will be capable of complying with IHL. In the other camp are the “techno-optimists”: scholars who believe not only that AWS will eventually be able to comply with IHL, but also that the use of AWS can make armed conflict less violent.

Lena Trabucco | New Article with Lena Trabucco About "Killer Robots" and IHL

April 21, 2022 – from OpinioJuris
A little-known aspect of the war in Ukraine is that both Russia and Ukraine have deployed weapons that are capable of being used fully autonomously: for Russia, Lancet drones; for Ukraine, Punisher drones. Both weapons are capable of being operated semi-autonomously, and it is not clear whether Russia or Ukraine has used them in their fully autonomous mode. But the mere possibility indicates that, like it or not, we are drawing inexorably closer to the day when autonomous weapons systems (AWS) are regular participants in armed conflict.

Christa Kuntzelman | Analysis: The U.K. Wants to Send Refugees to Rwanda. That’s Become a Trend.

April 20, 2022 – from The Washington Post
With global attention focused on the plight of people fleeing Ukraine, the U.K. government has announced a new pay-for-processing program with Rwanda. The policy would further close already heavily restricted U.K. borders by allowing British officials to target people arriving via the English Channel and send some of them 4,000 miles away. It is a response to ongoing debates in a post-Brexit context about how to stem arrivals to British shores — and, ultimately, how to limit who obtains asylum in the United Kingdom.

Silvia Otero Bahamon | Inequality in Bucaramanga: the miracle vanished

April 20, 2022 – from Vanguardia
Why did Bucaramanga go from being the great example of success in reducing inequality to having an alarming setback? In the research on Unequal Cities that I lead from the Universidad del Rosario, we have found that the main reason for the success of the beautiful city until 2016 was the labor income that grew at very fast rates for the poorest in the city. But in recent years the incomes of the poor and middle class have begun to decline, while the earnings of the richest 10% have begun to recover. These changes in the behavior of labor income were the main cause of the evolution of income inequality in the city, since other types of income, such as aid from remittances or subsidies, have been very marginal in the city.

Samara Klar | The Competing Influence of Policy Content and Political Cues: Cross-Border Evidence from the United States and Canada

April 20, 2022 – from American Political Science Review
When individuals evaluate policies, they consider both the policy’s content and its endorsers. In this study, we investigate the conditions under which these sometimes competing factors guide preferences. In an effort to combat the spread of COVID-19, American President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau bilaterally agreed to close their shared border to refugee claimants and asylum seekers. These ideologically opposed leaders endorsing a common policy allows us to test the influence of a well-known foreign neighbor on domestic policy evaluations. With a large cross-national survey experiment, we first find that Canadians and Americans follow ideological positions in evaluating the policy, with right-leaning respondents offering the most support.

Jason Hegelmeyer | Political Science Major and former Farrell Fellow Jason Hegelmeyer was elected as NU Associated Student Government President.

April 19, 2022 – from The Daily Northwestern
Weinberg junior Jason Hegelmeyer and SESP sophomore Donovan Cusick have won the Associated Student Government presidential election with over 70% of the vote. The slate won 1,385 of the 1,950 total votes cast. Hegelmeyer and Cusick’s opponents raked in 529 votes, while 36 students submitted a vote of no confidence, according to Election Commission Chair Jo Scaletty. The number of votes cast increased from last year’s 1,353 total votes, is down from 2,064 in 2020 and higher than the 852 in the uncontested 2019 election.

Ji Hye Choi | Truman Scholar Hopes to Make an Impact in Criminal Justice Reform

April 18, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
Northwestern University junior Ji Hye Choi has received a highly competitive 2022 Harry S. Truman Scholarship, a $30,000 award that supports graduate education for outstanding students who demonstrate leadership potential and plan to pursue a career in public service. Choi is a pre-law student and aspiring wrongful convictions attorney majoring in political science and minoring in Asian American studies — with a certificate in civic engagement — in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences.

Wendy Pearlman | How Homeland Experiences Shape Refugee Belonging: Rethinking Exile, Home, and Integration in the Syrian Case

April 14, 2022 – from International Migration Review
Studies of refugee belonging, as a key facet of integration, primarily focus on post-flight processes. Adopting an approach to integration that is temporally and spatially broader, this article argues that refugees’ varied experiences of belonging or estrangement in origin countries fundamentally condition their subsequent experiences of belonging or estrangement in settlement countries.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | Ketanji Brown Jackson Confirmed to the Supreme Court: ‘A Watershed Moment’

April 8, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
“The confirmation of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court is a watershed moment in our nation’s history,” Tillery said. “It is also a major win for President Biden, who has now kept a campaign promise to a crucial Democratic constituency and expanded the diversity of the Supreme Court. While it is understandable why the majority of Americans who wanted Judge Jackson confirmed to the Supreme Court might see her elevation as a sign that the country is finally moving past the polarization that characterized the Trump years, this would be a mistake.

Kimberly Marion Suiseeya & Annelise Riles |

April 7, 2022 – from Foreign Policy
Foreign Policy’s second annual Climate Summit returns against the backdrop of Earth Day for another year of high-impact programming dedicated to advancing scalable and inclusive strategies to combat climate change. With an eye toward identifying the solutions and partnerships that can drive deep decarbonization and sustainable development, this two-day summit will explore issues ranging from clean energy supply chains to finance for clean technology deployment to cleaner consumption.

Mara Suttman-Lea | electionline In Focus This Week

April 7, 2022 – from electionline
For this article, EVIC team member Jacob Bendicksen and I spoke to three early career election scholars: Joseph Anthony, teaching assistant professor of American politics at Oklahoma State University (who announced this week he will be joining SUNY-Cortland in the fall as an assistant professor of political science); Lia Merivaki, assistant professor of American politics at Mississippi State University and a member of the Carter Center’s U.S. Elections Expert Study Team; and Mara Suttmann-Lea, assistant professor of American politics at Connecticut College and host of What Voting Means to Me, a podcast about democracy – the latest episode of which dropped yesterday and features New York’s Dustin Czarny.

Jason Weber | Widening the Arch

April 7, 2022 – from Northwestern Magazine
At Northwestern’s virtual Commencement last June, Nolan Robinson opened his student address with a poem (above) that captured the essence of his Northwestern experience. “That entire speech really is a reflection of everything that has happened to me here, with the lessons I learned about knowing that I’m enough, that I don’t need to prove anything to anyone, that I belong here, that I’m worthy and that my voice is powerful,” says Robinson ’21.

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd | Religion in Praxis Conversation Series

April 5, 2022 – from Religion in Praxis
This is the tenth episode in the Religion in Praxis Conversations Series (previously known simply as "the Conversations Series") and today's speaker is Elizabeth Shakman Hurd. While offering important perspectives on the myriad evidentiary assessment challenges facing adjudicators, the legal and social scientific literature bypasses the political theological questions that interest me here. What are the theological and political conditions that sustain practices of political and religious asylum seeking despite the persistent limitations and limits surrounding legal adjudication involving religion? Given the instability of the category of religion, why do the authorities persist in trying to establish whether a person, action, belief, or practice is credibly subject to religious persecution? How might we understand religion anew in this context?

Ian Hurd | What would a world without the United Nations look like?

April 1, 2022 – from ABC AU
We know that it’s fundamentally aimed at maintaining international peace, security, and cooperation. But what does it actually do? What would a world without the UN look like? And how did it come about? Rod Quinn spoke to Ian Hurd, Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University; and author of After Anarchy: Legitimacy and Power in the UN Security Council, and How to Do Things with International Law.

March

Kumar Ramanathan | The Civil Rights Lobby: The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights and the Second Reconstruction By Shamira Gelbman

March 30, 2022 – from Cambridge University Press
The story of the legal and policy transformations of the “Second Reconstruction” often focuses on dramatic events in legislatures, courts, and protests. In The Civil Rights Lobby, Shamira Gelbman shifts our attention to an understudied group of actors: the lobbyists who connected advocacy organizations to policymakers in Washington. The book examines the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR), the most prominent civil rights-focused interest group coalition in national politics, from its early status as a “permanent ad hoc committee” in the 1950s to its central coordinating role in the lobbying campaign for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Gelbman traces these developments through a close analysis of the LCCR’s archives, supplemented by records of member organizations and leaders and interviews with two participants in the coalition’s 1960s lobbying campaigns.

Karen Alter & Ji Li | Chinese and Western Perspectives on the Rule of Law and their International Implications

March 30, 2022 – from SSRN
The “rule of law” (ROL) is invoked by multinational institutions, Western governments and in China as a political expectation of what legitimate governance looks like. Chinese leaders regularly make claims that are translated into commitments to uphold the ROL, and they generalize this rhetoric to the international level. This chapter, written for a forthcoming handbook on China and international law, compares different understandings of the rule of law in the West and in China. The question we ask is whether Chinese and Western leaders, practitioners and scholars mean fundamentally different things when they speak of the ‘rule of law’ as an ideal to aspire.

Mona Oraby | A Trickster’s Tokens: Christians and Waning Judicial Independence in Egypt

March 30, 2022 – from Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs
On February 8, 2022, Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi decreed his appointment of Judge Boulos Fahmy Eskandar to lead the Supreme Constitutional Court (SCC). As the first-ever Coptic Christian to serve in this capacity, does the appointment bode well for the rule of law and the status of Copts?

Jordan Gans-Morse | Jordan Gans-Morse and Ian Kelly: Ukraine is on the front line of defending Western democracy

March 30, 2022 – from Chicago Tribune
The question of whether Western nations should provide more meaningful military support to Ukraine dominated NATO’s recent summit. The operating logic here, at least the one most prevalent in Western media, is that Ukraine, too weak to withstand Russia’s massed forces, owes its very existence to the U.S. and its NATO allies. In fact, we owe more to the Ukrainians who are resisting Vladimir Putin than they do to us. The West has been far too complacent toward the threats of expansionist authoritarianism in Europe and East Asia and the rise of illiberal values in our own midst. Thanks to Ukrainians’ brave resistance and Putin’s brutal repression of freedom in Russia and Ukraine, we have begun to awaken to these threats to our fundamental values and institutions.

Nathalia Justo | Lessons Learned From ‘Encanto’

March 28, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
"Last night, 'Encanto' won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature. The movie has generated buzz beyond the screens. Psychologists are talking about how it depicts generational trauma. Others are discussing how accurately it portrays Colombia. But surprisingly less attention has been given to what seems to be the key message of the movie: people do not need to be special to deserve love, security, and ultimately, rights. Through song, 'Encanto' quietly teaches a powerful lesson about the flaws of U.S. immigration policy."

Isabel Castillo | Motivation Alignment, Historical Cleavages, and Women’s Suffrage in Latin America

March 28, 2022 – from Perspectives on Politics
Calculations of the electoral effects of incorporating new voters and beliefs on how inclusion alters gender hierarchies constitute two central motivations of decision makers when facing the prospect of suffrage reform. In contrast to the dominant electoral approach, by focusing on the case of early (before World War II) women’s suffrage in Latin America, I show that both these motivations are necessary and need to align for reform to occur. To explain the (mis)alignment of electoral calculations and social order concerns in Latin America, I consider the region’s historical oligarchic–anti-oligarchic cleavage structure, which is rooted in overlapping class and religious divisions.

Dan Krcmaric | Could Putin face punishment as a war criminal?

March 27, 2022 – from Vox
Despite these limitations, branding Putin a “war criminal” in the legal sense could still have consequences, particularly in the (unlikely) scenario where Putin loses power and wants to flee the country. As political scientists Alexander Downes and Daniel Krcmaric noted in the Washington Post last week, “there is little chance that the sitting leader of a major nuclear power will be hauled in front of the ICC. But the ICC investigation and Biden’s ‘war criminal’ label mean that a foreign retirement — or even foreign travel — is probably off the table.”

Jordan Gans-Morse | CNN Article: 4 Things to Remember About Trump, Ukraine and Putin

March 26, 2022 – from CNN
"When Trump muddies the water by praising Putin, or undermines Zelensky and spreads falsehoods about Ukraine, this has real implications for how this crisis plays out," said Jordan Gans-Morse, a Northwestern University professor who was a Fulbright Scholar in Ukraine. "It shapes public opinion in ways that tie Biden's hands when he's a de facto wartime president."

Ian Hurd & Jordan Gans-Morse | Northwestern Buffett Panel Discussion on Russia's War on Ukraine

March 25, 2022 – from Buffett Institute for Global Affairs
This Friday marked one month since Russia invaded Ukraine. Northwestern Buffett hosted a virtual panel discussion in partnership with Northwestern Weinberg's Russian, Eurasian and East European Studies (REEES) Program joined by scholars on the ground in Ukraine, regional experts, and leaders in international law, humanitarian medicine, media studies, diplomacy and military strategy discuss how sanctions have influenced the Russian public’s view of the war, the humanitarian response to the war so far, what universities can do to support Ukrainian scholars and students and more.

Matthew Lacombe & James Druckman | Social Disruption, Gun Buying, and Anti-System Beliefs (WP-22-13)

March 25, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
Gun ownership is a highly a consequential political behavior. It often signifies a belief about the inadequacy of state-provided security and leads to membership in a powerful political constituency (which is commonly mobilized by the National Rifle Association). As such, understanding why people purchase guns and how doing so affects the composition of gun owners is important, as it can have palpable political consequences. The researchers address these issues by exploring the dynamics of one of the largest gun-buying spikes in American history, which took place during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Matthew Lacombe & James Druckman | Social Disruption, Gun Buying, and Anti-System Beliefs (WP-22-13)

March 24, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
Gun ownership is a highly a consequential political behavior. It often signifies a belief about the inadequacy of state-provided security and leads to membership in a powerful political constituency (which is commonly mobilized by the National Rifle Association). As such, understanding why people purchase guns and how doing so affects the composition of gun owners is important, as it can have palpable political consequences. The researchers address these issues by exploring the dynamics of one of the largest gun-buying spikes in American history, which took place during the COVID-19 pandemic. They show that feelings of diffuse threat prompted many to buy guns.

Daniel Krcmaric | Biden called Putin a 'war criminal.' That's risky.

March 24, 2022 – from The Washington Post
Russia’s brutal war on Ukraine has many crying for justice. In the month since Russia’s invasion, the wheels of international justice are already turning. In early March, the International Criminal Court launched an investigation into possible Russian war crimes in Ukraine. And last week, the United States entered the fray when President Biden labeled Russian President Vladimir Putin a “war criminal.” It is hard to disagree with Biden’s assessment. Putin’s forces have committed horrific abuses during their attack on Ukraine. In the city of Mariupol alone, Russia bombed a maternity hospital and a theater where more than 1,000 civilians were sheltering. For these crimes — and many others — Putin certainly deserves to face justice.

Daniel Krcmaric | Biden called Putin a 'war criminal.' That's risky.

March 24, 2022 – from The Washington Post
Russia’s brutal war on Ukraine has many crying for justice. In the month since Russia’s invasion, the wheels of international justice are already turning. In early March, the International Criminal Court launched an investigation into possible Russian war crimes in Ukraine. And last week, the United States entered the fray when President Biden labeled Russian President Vladimir Putin a “war criminal.” It is hard to disagree with Biden’s assessment. Putin’s forces have committed horrific abuses during their attack on Ukraine. In the city of Mariupol alone, Russia bombed a maternity hospital and a theater where more than 1,000 civilians were sheltering. For these crimes — and many others — Putin certainly deserves to face justice.

James Druckman | Prevalence of Firearm Ownership Among Individuals With Major Depressive Symptoms

March 21, 2022 – from JAMA Network
Firearm ownership has been recognized as a major risk factor for suicide attempt and suicide death for at least 3 decades. Rates of handgun ownership were strongly associated with suicide rates, and the trends in each of these rates were shown to be associated over time. Most notably, a study of California residents found hazard of suicide to be 3 times greater among men and 7 times greater among women if they owned a firearm. With the increase in firearm purchases observed during the COVID-19 pandemic, the potential effect of this risk factor has only increased.

James Druckman & Matthew Lacombe | Prevalence of Firearm Ownership Among Individuals With Major Depressive Symptoms

March 21, 2022 – from JAMA Network
Firearm ownership has been recognized as a major risk factor for suicide attempt and suicide death for at least 3 decades.1 Rates of handgun ownership were strongly associated with suicide rates,2 and the trends in each of these rates were shown to be associated over time.3 Most notably, a study of California residents found hazard of suicide to be 3 times greater among men and 7 times greater among women if they owned a firearm.4 With the increase in firearm purchases observed during the COVID-19 pandemic,5 the potential effect of this risk factor has only increased.

Monique Newton | Former national champion pursuing passions, encouraging others to use their voice

March 21, 2022 – from NCAA
For Oberlin track and field standout Monique Newton, a defining moment of her college experience came away from the track: the 2014 killing of Tamir Rice by Cleveland police. "All I knew at the time was that a 12-year-old Black child, the same age as my cousin, Amani, back home, had been killed," said Newton, who was a freshman at the time of the killing. Rice's death ignited her passion in Black political organizing and protest. A first-generation college student unsure of her future, Newton originally thought she would study computer science when she arrived on campus in Ohio from Sacramento, California. She left Oberlin as a two-time track and field national champion and eight-time All-American with majors in politics and law and society, a minor in Africana studies and an invigorated sense of purpose.

Monique Newton | Former national champion pursuing passions, encouraging others to use their voice

March 21, 2022 – from NCAA
Story Links For Oberlin track and field standout Monique Newton, a defining moment of her college experience came away from the track: the 2014 killing of Tamir Rice by Cleveland police. "All I knew at the time was that a 12-year-old Black child, the same age as my cousin, Amani, back home, had been killed," said Newton, who was a freshman at the time of the killing. Rice's death ignited her passion in Black political organizing and protest. A first-generation college student unsure of her future, Newton originally thought she would study computer science when she arrived on campus in Ohio from Sacramento, California. She left Oberlin as a two-time track and field national champion and eight-time All-American with majors in politics and law and society, a minor in Africana studies and an invigorated sense of purpose.

Traci Burch | Officer-Involved Killings and the Repression of Protest

March 17, 2022 – from Urban Affairs Review
This article explores the likelihood that officer-involved killings affect protest. Analyzing respondents to the Collaborative Multiracial Political Survey (CMPS) reveals no increases in protest activity between treatment groups exposed to officer-involved killings in their local area prior to participating in the survey and control groups who were exposed to officer-involved killings after survey participation overall. In fact, local exposure to Black victims appears to repress protest, but only among young Black respondents. This effect depends on the characteristics of the victim and the incident, as killings of low threat Black victims do not seem to repress protest.

Nathalia Justo | Granting temporary protected status to Ukrainians is not enough

March 17, 2022 – from Chicago Tribune
With the designation of temporary protected status, or TPS, to Ukrainians by the Biden administration, familiar debates about the ethical responsibilities of the U.S. in the face of war resurfaced. On one side, activists and a bipartisan coalition argued that it would be morally untenable to send innocent people back to a war-riven country. On the other side, conservatives warned that this designation would open the way to potentially endless renewals, allowing Ukrainians to stay in the country for an unlimited amount of time. But both sides miss the bigger question of whether TPS is an adequate legal mechanism of protection in the first place. And they miss the fact that the U.S. government designed TPS to selectively limit its responsibility toward unprotected populations.

Elizabeth Good | 2022-23 Program on Negotiation (PON) Graduate Fellow at Harvard Law School

March 17, 2022 – from The Program on Negotiation
The Program on Negotiation (PON) is a consortium program of Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Tufts University and serves as an interdisciplinary research center dedicated to developing the theory and practice of negotiation and dispute resolution in a range of public and private settings. PON’s mission includes nurturing the next generation of negotiation teachers and scholars, helping students become more effective negotiators, and providing a forum for the discussion of ideas.

Nathalia Justo | Granting temporary protected status to Ukrainians is not enough

March 17, 2022 – from Chicago Tribune
With the designation of temporary protected status, or TPS, to Ukrainians by the Biden administration, familiar debates about the ethical responsibilities of the U.S. in the face of war resurfaced. On one side, activists and a bipartisan coalition argued that it would be morally untenable to send innocent people back to a war-riven country. On the other side, conservatives warned that this designation would open the way to potentially endless renewals, allowing Ukrainians to stay in the country for an unlimited amount of time. But both sides miss the bigger question of whether TPS is an adequate legal mechanism of protection in the first place.

Elizabeth Good | 2022-23 Program on Negotiation (PON) Graduate Fellow at Harvard Law School

March 17, 2022 – from https://bit.ly/3IDLeZ5
The Program on Negotiation (PON) is a consortium program of Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Tufts University and serves as an interdisciplinary research center dedicated to developing the theory and practice of negotiation and dispute resolution in a range of public and private settings. PON’s mission includes nurturing the next generation of negotiation teachers and scholars, helping students become more effective negotiators, and providing a forum for the discussion of ideas.

Will Reno | US response to Russia: ‘We are engaged in a vicious nuclear diplomacy’

March 16, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
The U.S., its NATO allies and the G7 nations continue to work to hold Putin accountable for his aggression against Ukraine. Northwestern University political scientist William Reno, an expert on the politics of violent conflict and the political effects of foreign military assistance is available to discuss avenues available for providing aid to Ukraine, and what needs to be off the table to avoid escalation of conflict between the nuclear-armed powers of the U.S. and Russia.

Jean Clipperton | Hewlett Fund for Curricular Innovation grant to support enhancements to the Mathcamp curriculum

March 16, 2022 – from Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences News Center
Grants or matching funds are available to one or more continuing faculty members or departments for projects that enhance undergraduate curricular innovation and development. Grants to individual faculty members generally range from $500 to $5,000, although groups and programs/departments may apply for larger grants.

Will Reno | US response to Russia: ‘We are engaged in a vicious nuclear diplomacy’

March 16, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
The U.S., its NATO allies and the G7 nations continue to work to hold Putin accountable for his aggression against Ukraine. Northwestern University political scientist William Reno, an expert on the politics of violent conflict and the political effects of foreign military assistance is available to discuss avenues available for providing aid to Ukraine, and what needs to be off the table to avoid escalation of conflict between the nuclear-armed powers of the U.S. and Russia.

Jeffrey Winters | What is an Oligarch?

March 16, 2022 – from Acast
The use of the word ‘Oligarch’ has been increasingly rampant across international news outlets since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine just weeks ago. But what does it actually mean? Jeffrey A. Winters, an American political scientist at Northwestern University who specialises in the study of oligarchy, notes that the common thread for oligarchs across history is that wealth defines them, empowers them and inherently exposes them to threats. While Dan makes his voyage home, Matt Lewis, from the ‘ Gone Medieval ’ podcast, steps in for this timely episode. To try and make sense of this ancient, yet contemporary phenomenon, Jeffrey joins Matt for a discussion of what oligarchy is, historic and contemporary cases and the relationship between oligarchy and democracy.

Jeffrey Winters | What is an Oligarch?

March 16, 2022 – from Acast
The use of the word ‘Oligarch’ has been increasingly rampant across international news outlets since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine just weeks ago. But what does it actually mean? Jeffrey A. Winters, an American political scientist at Northwestern University who specialises in the study of oligarchy, notes that the common thread for oligarchs across history is that wealth defines them, empowers them and inherently exposes them to threats. While Dan makes his voyage home, Matt Lewis, from the ‘ Gone Medieval ’ podcast, steps in for this timely episode. To try and make sense of this ancient, yet contemporary phenomenon, Jeffrey joins Matt for a discussion of what oligarchy is, historic and contemporary cases and the relationship between oligarchy and democracy.

Sarah Moore | In Colombia, abortion is no longer a crime. But rural women will still find it hard to get one.

March 15, 2022 – from The Washington Post
In late February, Colombia’s highest court ruled that having an abortion would no longer be a criminal offense. Previously, women in Colombia could have abortions only under certain conditions. Women can no longer be imprisoned for medical abortions, and health-care providers cannot legally deny abortions to women who request them or are at least required to refer women to providers who offer them.

Nathan Dial | Nathan Dial appointed Aspen Security Forum 2022-23 Fellow

March 14, 2022 – from Aspen Security Forum
From Richmond, VA, Dr. Nathan Dial is an Active-Duty Major in the US Air Force. In 2021, Nathan received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Northwestern University, concentrating on comparative politics and minoring in qualitative and quantitative methods. His dissertation developed a theory on why the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) pursues out-of-area activities in the 21st Century.

Swati Srivastava | Faculty Spotlight: Professor Swati Srivastava

March 14, 2022 – from Purdue University
Assistant Professor Swati Srivastava specializes in International Relations and researches global governance, especially how private actors like corporations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) interact with governments. Her research program asks three interrelated questions: (1) How is private power expressed in global politics? (2) How does global private power interact with public power? (3) How can global private power be held accountable? These questions form the basis of understanding a world where private actors organize violence, regulate markets, and influence rights alongside states.

Marina Henke | “We are probably headed for a guerrilla war”

March 13, 2022 – from Cicero
There is currently no end of the war in sight in Ukraine. Marina E. Henke, Professor of International Relations at the Hertie School and director of the Center for International Security, explains in an interview why she does not believe in a timely compromise solution, why it would be dangerous if NATO intervened directly in the conflict, which Putin says drives and there is therefore only one direction for Russia: ahead.

Jordan Gans-Morse | We must Trump-proof the nuclear codes before 2024

March 11, 2022 – from NBC News
As Russia lays siege to multiple Ukrainian cities and President Vladimir Putin puts his nuclear deterrent forces on alert, the United States and its NATO allies face the most severe geopolitical crisis of the post-Cold War era. These events should serve as a stark warning: The office of the presidency, with its all but unlimited authority over the decision to employ nuclear weapons, needs to be Trump-proofed well before the 2024 presidential elections.

Jordan Gans-Morse | Ukraine: What We Know and What You Can Do

March 11, 2022 – from Steve Cochran's Live from My Office
The ongoing nightmare in Ukraine has never-ending questions and not enough answers. And then there's the big question...what can we do? Mark and Kip Doyle are about to personally distribute supply bags to refugees and you can help the cause! Jordan Gans-Morse teaches political science at Northwestern and knows Russia and Ukraine inside out. Hear it all here on this speical episode of LIVE FROM MY OFFICE.

Laurel Harbridge-Yong | How Do Partisans Navigate Intra-Group Conflict? A Theory of Leadership-Driven Motivated Reasoning

March 11, 2022 – from Springer
When faced with co-partisan politicians who disagree publicly, what side do partisan voters take? We draw on social identity theory to develop a theory of partisan leadership cues arguing that leaders have a key role in social groups and because of that centrality, and accounting for affect-based motivation, co-partisan voters resist ingroup dissent. We test this theory with a series of experiments focused on leaders who violate democratic norms and responses from within the party that reflect loyalty or dissent. Our findings show that co-partisan voters are loathe to punish misbehaving leaders, except when their action represents a major threat and the criticism comes from a high ranking party member.

Jordan Gans-Morse | Russian Tea Time restaurant was founded by Ukrainians. Now it faces misplaced backlash.

March 10, 2022 – from Chicago Tribune
The iconic downtown restaurant Russian Tea Time is facing backlash from callers and social media reviewers mistakenly linking the venue’s name to Moscow’s brutal war against Ukraine, as anti-Russian sentiment rises across the globe. Yet the Chicago restaurant’s owners say the fallout has been particularly hurtful because their business was actually founded by a Ukrainian chef, and many current employees also hail from Ukraine.

Jeffrey Winters | Who are Russian oligarchs, and how did they get so rich?

March 10, 2022 – from Marketplace
The list of sanctions against Russian oligarchs keeps growing. On Thursday, the British government sanctioned seven of them, including Roman Abramovich, the owner of Chelsea Football Club — putting an end to his attempt to sell the reigning European champions. Here in the United States, President Joe Biden called out Russia’s oligarchs in his State of the Union speech, and the federal government has established a task force devoted to, in part, enforcing sanctions against them. France recently seized a superyacht of one alleged oligarch, the European Union has been adding names to the list of oligarchs it’s targeting, and Japan recently froze the assets of dozens of Russian officials and oligarchs. But let’s go back to basics. Who are these oligarchs? What are they? And how much power do they actually have?

Jordan Gans-Morse | Russia Taking Over Ukraine Could Be a Headache for Putin

March 9, 2022 – from Newsweek
Russian President Vladimir Putin is facing fierce resistance from Ukrainians in his quest to "demilitarize" the country but even if Ukraine surrenders to Russia, maintaining control of the country won't be easy. Russia has claimed it has no plans to occupy Ukraine but Putin's comments ahead of the invasion raised significant concerns about his desire to expand Russia's territory. If Ukraine were to fall, rebuilding the country would come at a significant economic price and a hefty investment on Putin's part to squelch the underground resistance.

Alvin Tillery | Senate unanimously passes historic anti-lynching legislation

March 8, 2022 – from WBEZ Chicago
After more than a century and 200 failed attempts, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed a bill Monday that makes lynching a federal hate crime. The Emmett Till Anti-lynching Act was introduced by Illinois Congressman Bobby Rush and is expected to be signed by President Biden. Reset learns more about the legislation and what it means for the ongoing fight for racial justice in the U.S. GUESTS: Professor Alvin Tillery, director of the Center for the Study of Diversity and Democracy; and associate professor of political science and African American studies Rev. Wheeler Parker, cousin of Emmett Till

Marina Henke | "Waffenlieferungen als Abschreckung"

March 7, 2022 – from zdfheute
Mit den Waffenlieferungen an die Ukraine wolle man Russland abschrecken, sagt Sicherheitsexpertin Prof. Marina Henke. Dadurch erhoffe man, dass sich auf russischer Seite etwas tut.

Marina Henke | Germany Didn’t Used to Spend Much on its Military. Putin Changed That.

March 6, 2022 – from The Washington Post
"Russia’s war against Ukraine continues, but one thing is already clear. Russian President Vladimir Putin has achieved — albeit inadvertently — what nobody else could: a revolution in German security and defense policy. In a remarkable session of the Bundestag on Feb. 27, German Chancellor Olaf Scholz announced measures that many believed impossible only days earlier. These include a $113 billion defense fund to modernize the German military — anchored in Germany’s Basic Law so that it cannot be used for any other purpose in the future — and an increase in annual defense spending to more than 2 percent of gross domestic product."

Mara Suttmann | Can Electoral Management Bodies Expand the Pool of Registered Voters? Examining the Effects of Face-to-Face, Remote, Traditional, and Social Media Outreach

March 6, 2022 – from Policy Studies
"Electoral management bodies have a responsibility to ensure voters have equitable access to the election process, starting with providing information to successfully navigate it. In this article, we assess the educative effects of different modes of election official voter education on completing the voter registration process."

Swati Srivastava | Corporate Sovereign Awakening and the Making of Modern State Sovereignty: New Archival Evidence from the English East India Company

March 4, 2022 – from Cambridge University Press
"The English East India Company's “company-state” lasted 274 years—longer than most states. This research note uses new archival evidence to study the Company as a catalyst in the development of modern state sovereignty. Drawing on the records of 16,740 managerial and shareholder meetings between 1678 and 1795, I find that as the Company grew through wars, its claim to sovereign authority shifted from a privilege delegated by Crown and Parliament to a self-possessed right."

Karen Alter | Those who aid and abet Putin are 'vulnerable to prosecution and asset seizure'

March 3, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
EVANSTON, Ill. --- Yesterday the ICC (international criminal court) in the Hague announced it would launch an investigation into possible war crimes enacted by Russia against the civilians of Ukraine. Political science, history and law school faculty from Northwestern University discuss how President Putin’s invasion of Ukraine flouts the rules of international law, and what avenues are available in meting out consequences and de-escalating the war.

Jordan Gans-Morse | Are we calling this an invasion? It's really a war.'

March 2, 2022 – from Chicago Reader
There were two crowds in front of Saints Volodymyr and Olha Ukrainian Catholic Church in Ukrainian Village on a frigid afternoon last week. One was the medieval crowd that’s always there, on the church’s iconic mural—a depiction of the baptism of the Ukrainian people. The other consisted of several hundred live and livid Chicagoans reacting to Russia’s attack on the Ukrainian nation just hours earlier. They waved Ukraine’s yellow-and-blue flag, sang its national anthem, called for sanctions and other help, and listened to supportive words from the likes of Congressman Mike Quigley.

Jordan Gans-Morse & Ian Hurd | Northwestern Buffett Panel Discussion of Russia's Invasion of Ukraine

March 1, 2022 – from Buffett Institute for Global Affairs
On Monday, February 28th convened a virtual panel discussion on the unfolding Russian invasion of Ukraine, featuring perspectives from faculty experts including NU Political Science Department’s Ian Hurd (Professor of Political Science and Director of the Weinberg College Center for International and Area Studies) and Jordan Gans-Morse (Associate Professor of Political Science in Northwestern's Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences). The discussion was moderated by Northwestern Buffett Executive Director Annelise Riles.

Jordan Gans-Morse | The View From Kyiv: ‘It’s not going to end with Ukraine if Ukraine falls’

March 1, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
Answering a question about what motivates Vladimir Putin, Jordan Gans-Morse, professor of political science at Northwestern and an expert on the former Soviet Union, said that many factors are at play including the fact that “It’s intolerable to [Putin] to have a democratic nation … right on his border, creating some sort of model that his own people might want to follow.”

February

Michelle Bueno Vasquez | Afro-Latinas stress the complexity of their roots

February 28, 2022 – from IL Latino News
Michelle Bueno Vasquez a Ph.D. candidate at Northwestern University studying political science and transnational Afro-Latino diaspora, said “For some people, that’s a difficult thing to reckon with, that you’re going to introduce that difference and expose yourself to racist harm, subconsciously some folks just don’t want to go there, they would rather not identify as Black.” According to a study by the State University of New York at Albany, Latinos who identify themselves as Black have lower-incomes, higher unemployment rates, higher poverty rates, less education, and fewer opportunities than those who identify themselves as “White” or “other”. Bueno Vasquez said the mobilization of Latino political organizations has encouraged many Afro-Latinos to identify themselves with Latinos instead of their Black roots in order to gain more funding from the government.

Ian Hurd | Read the words as they appear - Russia is not a member of the United Nations Security Council

February 28, 2022 – from Chicago Tribune
With a Russian invasion looming, the Ukrainian ambassador sat across from his Russian counterpart, his first chance to unload the frustrations and anxieties of a nation directly to its aggressor. He opened not with a complaint about shelling or a defense of sovereignty but with a request that the United Nations release the legal memos from 1991 that permitted Russia to take over the Soviet Union’s old seat at the Security Council. The apparently obscure reference, made even more arcane by the fact that everyone knows there are no memos, may have seemed to many observers an odd choice given the stakes of the moment, but it opened a diplomatic front in the war between Russia and Ukraine that may have some sting.

Karen Alter, Jordan Gans-Morse & Ian Hurd | Russia and Ukraine: What Is at Stake in this Crisis?

February 25, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
As Russian forces close in on Kyiv, “a new world order” is upon us and Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine will echo for years to come, according to Jordan Gans-Morse, a Northwestern political scientist and expert on the former Soviet Union. In order to make sense of the developing news, Northwestern Now asked Gans-Morse and several other experts to weigh in. Ian Kelly is the ambassador-in-residence at Northwestern. Karen Alter is the Norman Dwight Harris Professor of International Relations and co-director of the Research Group on Global Capitalism and Law. Ian Hurd is a professor of political science. And, Michael Allen is an associate professor of history.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | Northwestern professor launches DEI business forum

February 23, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
The Center for the Study of Diversity and Democracy (CSDD) at Northwestern University announced today (Feb. 23) the launch of a business forum that will connect academic researchers with industry leaders to address diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) issues arising in today’s global marketplace.The new CSDD Business Forum aims to provide business leaders with cutting-edge social science research to generate insights they can translate to their own DEI initiatives.

James N. Druckman | The January 6th, 2025, Project

February 21, 2022 – from The Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy
The January 6th, 2025, Project seeks to understand the social, political, psychological, and demographic factors that led to the January 6th, 2021, insurrection and continue to threaten the stability of our democratic system of government. Through our research, teaching, and public engagement, we hope to offer an assessment of the state of our democracy and insight into how to protect and strengthen it, with a special emphasis on how to prepare for the attack on our electoral system that will likely occur on January 6th, 2025.

Mert Arslanalp | Resistance to Erdoğan’s encroachment at Turkey’s top university, one year on

February 21, 2022 – from Brookings
The start of 2021 was shocking as mobs attacked the U.S. Capitol, the bastion of American democracy, in an attempt to stop the certification of the presidential election. Simultaneously and far from the United States, a less conspicuous onslaught on another bastion of liberal democratic values unfolded when Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan arbitrarily appointed a hand-picked rector to run Istanbul’s Bogaziçi University.

Amos Sawyer | Liberia: Dr. Amos Sawyer, Former Interim President, Dies

February 17, 2022 – from Liberian Observer
Dr. Amos Claudius Sawyer, a man whose enviable vantage point at the intersection of various dimensions of Liberian history might be a subject of study for years to come, has died. He was 76. Dr. Sawyer was a Liberian academic, activist and politician. Highlights of his enviable career included service to his country, Liberia, as interim President from 1990 to 1994. Prior to that, he ran for Mayor of Monrovia, the nation’s capital, as an independent candidate. Dr. Sawyer was a founding member of the Movement for Justice in Africa (MOJA) and in 1983 founded the Liberian People's Party. As an academic, he worked as a professor of political science at the University of Liberia. In December 1980, he was appointed Dean of the College of Social Sciences and acting director of the University.

Kevin Mullinix | Rational Choice and Information Processing

February 17, 2022 – from The Cambridge Handbook of Political Psychology
The Cambridge Handbook of Political Psychology provides a comprehensive review of the psychology of political behaviour from an international perspective. By taking a distinctively international approach, this handbook highlights the nuances of political behaviour across cultures and geographical regions, as well as the truisms of political psychology that transcend context. Academics, graduate students and practitioners alike, as well as those generally interested in politics and human behaviour, will benefit from this definitive overview of how people shape — and are shaped by — their political environment in a rapidly changing twenty-first century.

Ariel Zellman | Uneasy Lies the Crown: External Threats to Religious Legitimacy and Interstate Dispute Militarization

February 15, 2022 – from Security Studies
Although often argued that religion should significantly influence international conflict, the empirical record is mixed. For every recurrent interreligious conflict, there are numerous examples of sustained interreligious cooperation. Conflict also frequently mars the oft-assumed peaceful relations between shared-religion states. We argue that religion is an important intervening factor in interstate dispute militarization, especially between internally threatened rivals. In mixed-religion dyads, conflict often follows oppression of cross-border coreligionists, whereas in shared-religion dyads, conflict occurs as one side disproportionately increases its official support for that religion. In both instances, dispute militarization is primarily an effort to undercut domestic competitors, whose challenge is augmented by external threats to leaders’ religious legitimacy.

Safa Al-Saeedi | Partial Hegemony, The Arab Spring, and Lebanon's Ongoing Political Crisis

February 10, 2022 – from POMEPS
Jeff Colgan of Brown University joins Marc Lynch on this week’s podcast to discuss his new book, Partial Hegemony: Oil Politics and International Order. In the book, Colgan offers lessons for leaders and analysts seeking to design new international governing arrangements to manage an array of pressing concerns. (Starts at 0:38). Safa Al-Saeedi of Northwestern University discusses her latest article, “The Arab spring: why did the uprisings miss the monarchies?,“ published in Contemporary Politics. (Starts at 29:13). Bassel Salloukh of the Doha Institute discusses Lebanon’s ongoing political crisis. (Starts at 42:08).

Jaime Dominguez | Chicago Tonight: Latino Voices

February 5, 2022 – from WTTW News
Grading the president on his immigration policies. A Mexican ballet company returns. New songs to spice up your playlist. And a classic Mexican cocktail hits liquor store shelves. CBS 2 Chicago’s Marissa Parra guest hosts.

Matthew Nelsen | What prompts young people to take action?

February 4, 2022 – from St. Olaf College
Active and equitable participation is key to a well-functioning democracy. It’s important to have people from a wide variety of backgrounds run for public office, push for legislation, call for change, and show up at the polls to vote. Yet researchers know remarkably little about how young people come to participate in politics and how institutions — in particular, schools and the civic lessons they offer — shape this behavior across racial and ethnic groups. Matt Nelsen ’12 is working to change that. His research on the socioeconomic factors that shape political involvement in youth has been featured in the Washington Post, and recently won the Best Dissertation Award from the American Political Science Association.

Matthew Nelsen | Matthew Nelsen: Assistant Professor at the University of Miami

February 4, 2022 – from Twitter
"Emerging from Chicago’s latest winter storm to share some exciting news: this fall I will be joining the Department of Political Science at the University of Miami as a tenure track assistant professor! I’m absolutely thrilled to be joining such a fantastic group of scholars and look forward to teaching Race, Ethnicity, and Politics and Urban Politics on campus in the fall. I am indebted to those who have stood by my side while navigating three incredibly difficult job markets seasons: First and foremost, my committee: Traci Burch, Cathy Cohen, Jamie Druckman, and Reuel Rogers. Thank you for encouraging me to trust my intellectual instincts."

Marina Henke | Video: How does the CDU feel about Russia?

February 3, 2022 – from Das Erste
The CSU is thinking about how it wants to do politics in the opposition. One topic: energy policy. The government's foreign policy is endangering Germany's energy supply. According to the CSU, the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline is needed for this. Not so easy in a situation in which Russian politics is perceived as a threat.

James N. Druckman | Quoted: Nearly One-Quarter of Americans Believe Violent Protest Against the Government Can Ever be Justified

February 2, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
A national poll provides a snapshot into public sentiment about the acceptability of violent protest against federal, state and local government, providing current insights about the state of U.S. democracy and safety of government officials. The study reveals that nearly one-quarter (23%) of Americans believe engagement in violent protest against the government can ever be justified, with 10 percent saying it is justified right now. “This is a concerning finding,” said Northwestern political scientist James Druckman. “While it does not suggest that people are currently arming with the intent to engage in political violence, it does reveal that people perceive the country as being at a place where such behavior is reasonable. This coheres with widespread concerns about democratic backsliding.”

Florencia Guerzovich | Scale up in Time: Revisiting how we Evidence Process & Context

February 1, 2022 – from Medium
In this post, we argue that politics in the transparency, participation, and accountability field happen in time. There is more to politics and change in time than black and white debates about short and long term support. Temporal contexts are about stability and change, timing time horizons, sequences, feedback loops, gradualism vs. shock therapies, etc. They provide a concrete way to to grapple with how agents contribute to scale through different pathways in complex, uncertain systems that make up a world of greys and mixed results — i.e. the world of much TPA work.

January

Elizabeth Meehan | To Twitter or Not to Twitter?

January 31, 2022 – from APSA Preprints Political Science Education and the Profession
Political science graduate students have flocked to join #AcademicTwitter in recent years. However, navigating the social media landscape can be daunting for graduate students trying to find their stride. We highlight six different approaches for Twitter among political scientists to provide graduate students a blueprint for navigating the app. Specifically, we note that Twitter can help students find research, promote their own work, ask for advice, and network among other uses. We conclude with tips on maintaining boundaries and ensuring one's safety while using the app.

James Druckman | Quoted: Researchers assess nationwide COVID-19 attitudes and masking adherence

January 27, 2022 – from The Daily Northwestern
The COVID States Project, co-led by political science Prof. Jamie Druckman, tracks varying attitudes and responses to public health guidance across the U.S. Three of their most recent reports examined COVID-19 data considering several socioeconomic factors, which second-year political science Ph.D. student Jennifer Lin said provides an understanding of the development of the pandemic in real time and information in the case of future outbreaks.

James Druckman | Myths of Censorship: The Realities and Misperceptions of "Cancel Culture"

January 26, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
Few principles are as central to American democracy as freedom of speech. Yet, some argue “cancel culture”—i.e., censoring offensive speech—undermines this crucial tenet. The authors offer a theory of why people “cancel” others and test it using a conjoint experiment with a representative sample of Americans. They find that when Americans engage in canceling, they do so because of what was said, regardless of the speaker’s identity. Cancellation reflects an attempt to redress speech considered harmful, not punishment borne of partisan or racial animosity. But the researchers also show that the public is significantly misinformed about cancellation: People overestimate the extent to which canceling occurs and they misconstrue why it happens. Even though partisan bias does not cause canceling, (mis-)beliefs about canceling could exacerbate partisan animosity.

Maya Novak-Herzog & Tabitha Bonilla | Gender and the Political Science Graduate Experience: When Leaning In Isn't Enough

January 26, 2022 – from APSA Preprints Politics of Gender
Graduate programs present challenges for women that mirror those in society and are also compounded by entrenched norms within the academy and the discipline. This chapter seeks to guide women-identifying graduate students on navigating these challenges and combat the often isolating experience academia presents. The perception that women are less methodologically and theoretically rigorous in their research is only one of many stressors impacting women in the academy and political science. Through the various lenses of learning, teaching, and research, we provide tangible advice for women in the discipline to find success and balance while creating space for the things that brought you to study political science at a graduate level in the first place.

Swati Srivastava | Constructivists All the Way Down

January 26, 2022 – from Whiskey & International Relations Theory
Is Constructivism best understood as a scholarly disposition, a body of theory, or an intellectual movement? Is it still relevant, or has it exceeded its shelf life? What if there are lots of Constructivists but they use different labels for their work?

Silvia Otero Bahamon | Un caleidoscopio de desigualdades

January 26, 2022 – from Vanguardia
Estimados lectores de Vanguardia. A partir hoy los acompañaré como columnista cada quince días. Hace mucho tiempo me formé en la sala de redacción de este periódico en un semillero de jóvenes llamado Sardinos, que publicaba una página quincenal con nuestros escritos. Me da mucha felicidad volver a estas páginas 25 años después para hablar sobre temas de actualidad política, y especialmente sobre las problemáticas que estudié en mi doctorado en Ciencia Política y que investigo como profesora de la Universidad del Rosario.

Tabitha Bonilla | Gender and the Political Science Graduate Experience: When Leaning In Isn't Enough

January 26, 2022 – from APSA Preprints, Politics of Gender
Graduate programs present challenges for women that mirror those in society and are also compounded by entrenched norms within the academy and the discipline. This chapter seeks to guide women-identifying graduate students on navigating these challenges and combat the often isolating experience academia presents. The perception that women are less methodologically and theoretically rigorous in their research is only one of many stressors impacting women in the academy and political science. Through the various lenses of learning, teaching, and research, we provide tangible advice for women in the discipline to find success and balance while creating space for the things that brought you to study political science at a graduate level in the first place. This manuscript is part of Strategies for Navigating Graduate School and Beyond, a forthcoming volume for those interested in pursuing g

Tabitha Bonilla | The Importance of Campaign Promises

January 24, 2022 – from Cambridge University Press
Campaign promises are a cornerstone of representative democracy. Candidates make promises to signal to voters their intentions in office and voters evaluate candidates based on those promises. This study unpacks the theorized pathway regarding campaign promises: not whether promises are kept, but what purpose promises serve, what they signal, and how they affect voter decision-making. The author explores the pathways and conditions influencing promises and finds that promises tend to have a polarizing effect on voters' opinions of politicians, attracting similarly-positioned voters and strongly repelling voters who disagree with a candidate's position. In addition, voters perceive promise breakers as less honest and less likely to follow through than candidates who more weakly took the same position.

Sally Nuamah | Political Mobilization Around Chicago School Closings Policy Brief

January 21, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
In 2012, the Chicago Public Schools board initiated the largest wave of school closures in U.S. history, shutting down 49 out of nearly 500 public schools. These schools were in predominately Black neighborhoods on the city’s South and West sides. In the American Political Science Review, IPR political scientist and social policy expert Sally Nuamah and political scientist Thomas Ogorzalek document how the closures changed the political behavior of Black Chicagoans who lived in communities targeted for a school closure. Despite relatively low participation rates in the democratic process before the closures, these citizens—who are from some of the city’s poorest neighborhoods—increased their political engagement. Their research supports a model of place-based mobilization, or the process of citizens responding to policy change concentrated in their local community.

Jahara Matisek | Little Blue Helmets in Kazakhstan

January 19, 2022 – from The Diplomat
Images of Kazakh troops wearing United Nations-branded blue peacekeeping helmets, while handling stun grenades during protests in Almaty, crossed a blue line. Anti-government protests that began on January 2 have led to over 160 Kazakhs being killed, thousands injured, and thousands more detained. Despite the violence, the U.N. is not deployed in Kazakhstan. The U.N. has issued a statement asking Kazakh leaders to show “restraint,” and U.N. human right experts condemned the government for labeling the protestors as “terrorists.” Notwithstanding such “a war of words,” these “Little Blue Helmets” – fake U.N. peacekeeping troops – are using a false flag to repress Kazakh citizens. The international community must respond to the unsanctioned use of an internationally protected symbol.

Diego Rossello | Remarks on Animal Labour: Towards a New Frontier of Interspecies Justice?

January 18, 2022 – from Politics and Animals
Animal Labour is an important and much needed addition to the field of animal studies (Blattner, Coulter, and Kymlicka, 2020a). In the last few years, animal studies has become a vibrant field of scholarship comprising a broad range of academic disciplines, from animal ethics and critical animal studies to cognitive ethology, among others. But one of the most stimulating recent developments in the field has been the so-called political turn in animal rights theory (Milligan, 2015; Garner and O’Sullivan, 2016). Although the political turn in animal rights theory focuses mainly on issues of citizenship and political representation of animals’ interests, it has remained inattentive to the ethico-political implications of animal labor. Thus, by focusing on animal labor as “a site of interspecies justice” the book fills a void in the literature (Blattner, Coulter, and Kymlicka, 2020b, p. 12).

William Reno | Book Review: How Insurgency Begins: Rebel Group Formation in Uganda and Beyond

January 14, 2022 – from Political Science Quarterly
It is a given in most quarters that that the marginalization of ethnic groups from the corridors of state power is a primary cause of rebellion, particularly in poor countries with weak government control in rural areas open to rebel organizing. Rebellions, however, often emerge among groups that have a share of state power and fail to gain traction among groups that are excluded from power. This observation is at the heart of Janet Lewis's exploration of the earliest stage of rebellion in Uganda, host to 16 rebel groups that Lewis identifies since the current government fought its way to power in 1986. Through extensive field research, including interviews with many directly involved in forming rebel groups and fighting them, Lewis is well positioned to explain why rebel groups succeed or fail in their earliest stages.

Chloe Thurston | Balancing optimal policy and real-world politics

January 14, 2022 – from Crain's Chicago Business
So far, Evanston's efforts have yielded a $400,000 fund to be used for grants of up to $25,000 for Black homeowners, who resided in Evanston between 1919 and 1969, that can be used for mortgages or home improvements. This has been lauded as a step toward recognizing and redressing the city's role in racial economic disparities. It's also been criticized for being overly narrow in its eligibility criteria.

James Druckman | Racial bias in perceptions of disease and policy

January 13, 2022 – from Sage Journals: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
Narratives about Africa as dark, depraved, and diseased justified the exploitation of African land and people. Today, these narratives may still have a hold on people’s fears about disease. We test this in three (pre-COVID-19) experiments (N = 1,803). Across studies, we find that participants report greater worry about a pandemic originating in Africa (vs. elsewhere). In turn, they report greater support for travel bans and for loosening abortion restrictions. We then document these narratives in an archival study of newspaper articles of the 2015–2016 Zika pandemic (N = 1,475). We find that articles were more negative—for example, they included more death-related words—if they mentioned Africa. Finally, we replicate the experimental results within the COVID-19 context, using a representative sample (N = 1,200).

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | Reflections on MLK Day

January 13, 2022 – from C Street Advisory Group
The holiday celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is an important moment of reflection for me each year. As an African American born three years after the movement Dr. King and others led to make America a multiracial democracy, the course of my life has been fundamentally shaped by the impact of his efforts. Without Dr. King’s work, I would have grown up in a different neighborhood, been educated in schools of lesser quality, and have had far less freedom to move in this society which is typically hostile to Black bodies.

Chloe Thurston | New Illinois Law Allows Homeowners to Remove Racist Language from Home Deeds

January 7, 2022 – from ABC Chicago
Chloe Thurston, an assistant professor of political science at Northwestern University, authored a book on housing discrimination in the 20th century titled "At the Boundaries of Homeownership: Credit, Discrimination, and the American State.""If you have a house that was built before 1950, there's a pretty good chance that there's a restrictive covenant in the deed, particularly if that was a neighborhood that was historically predominantly white," she explained.

Mara Suttmann-Lea | What Voting Means to Me: Episode 11. Spenser Mestel

January 6, 2022 – from What Voting Means To Me: A Podcast About Democracy
In this re-launch episode of "What Voting Means to Me," Spenser Mestel and Mara discuss this idea and much more. Spencer is an independent journalist and poll worker based in Brooklyn New York— who shares his appreciation for the wonderful and yes, 'forgettable' voting experiences he has had, his hopes for a less burdensome system of voting in the United States, and how elite partisan rhetoric and a lack of public understanding of how elections are run have combined to become a potent threat to American democracy.

Mneesha Gellman | One Year Later: Emerson Professors Reflect on Insurrection

January 6, 2022 – from Emerson Today
“The insurrection, as I would call it, that took place a year ago, was a critical juncture in which the foundation of U.S. democracy eroded a little further,” said Mneesha Gellman, associate professor of political science in the Marlboro Institute of Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies and director of the Emerson Prison Initiative. Gellman said former President Donald Trump’s denial of election results facilitated the events of January 6, and undermined a core aspect of procedural democracy – free and fair elections. That threat has continued over the past year through redistricting, changes in allowable identification at voting locations, timelines to register and submit ballots by mail, closing polling places, and more, said Gellman.

Ross Carroll | Uncivil Mirth: Ridicule in Enlightenment Britain

January 6, 2022 – from New Books Network
Political Theorist Ross Carroll takes the reader through Enlightenment conversations about the use of ridicule and laughter in politics and political engagement in his new book, Uncivil Mirth: Ridicule in Enlightenment Britain (Princeton UP, 2021) explores, as a framework, two schools of thought on the place of ridicule in political engagement, Thomas Hobbes and those who took their approach to understanding human nature from Hobbes, and the Third Earl of Shaftsbury, and those who followed his arguments. Carroll dives into these two approaches to the use of ridicule, unpacking not only the ideas around how ridicule can be used in politics, but also how it might be managed appropriately, noting the dichotomous approach to ridicule as part of the Age of Enlightenment and Reason.

Ross Carroll | Uncivil Mirth: Ridicule in Enlightenment Britain

January 6, 2022 – from New Books Network
Political Theorist Ross Carroll takes the reader through Enlightenment conversations about the use of ridicule and laughter in politics and political engagement in his new book, Uncivil Mirth: Ridicule in Enlightenment Britain (Princeton UP, 2021) explores, as a framework, two schools of thought on the place of ridicule in political engagement, Thomas Hobbes and those who took their approach to understanding human nature from Hobbes, and the Third Earl of Shaftsbury, and those who followed his arguments. Carroll dives into these two approaches to the use of ridicule, unpacking not only the ideas around how ridicule can be used in politics, but also how it might be managed appropriately, noting the dichotomous approach to ridicule as part of the Age of Enlightenment and Reason.

Lexi Neame | PhD Lexi Neame Has Joined Reed College as a Visiting Assistant Professor

January 6, 2022 – from Reed College
My research and teaching interests are in the history of political thought, contemporary democratic and feminist theory, and the politics of science, technology and the environment (particularly statistics and statecraft, climate science, and contemporary data politics). My book manuscript (tentatively called Common Knowledge) is occasioned by the crisis of authoritative knowledge in democratic societies. Drawing on the thought of Hannah Arendt as well as interdisciplinary literature on democracy and expertise, new communication technologies, and digital publics, it explores how scientific and technical knowledge translates, circulates and becomes contested in the public realm. I also lead an interdisciplinary research project called Arendt on Earth: From the Archimedean Point to the Anthropocene (www.arendtonearth.com), funded by Humanities Without Walls and the Mellon Foundation.

Alvin B. Tillery Jr. | Capitol Under Siege, One Year Later

January 5, 2022 – from Northwestern Now
“Perhaps the most disappointing thing that we have learned is that the American people are largely content to watch their democracy burn,” said political scientist Alvin Tillery, director of Northwestern’s Center for the Study of Diversity and Democracy. “Two years after the largest mass protest movement in American history in the name of #BlackLivesMatter and after watching incredibly brave young people strike out for Democracy in places like Hong Kong and Nigeria, the American people are greeting the continuing assault on our democracy with a resounding ‘meh.’ So, on this eve of the one-year anniversary of the Capitol uprising, my warning to Americans, particularly people of color, is that we are not safe.”

Andrew Koppelman | The Bad Argument Against Covid Mandates That the Gorsuch Gang Might Embrace

January 5, 2022 – from The New Republic
For many purposes—notably, responding to a pandemic—a strong federal government is right handy. But for more than 200 years, some Americans, thinking that they were promoting personal liberty, have tried to persuade the Supreme Court to interpret federal law in a way that would hobble the government. It is happening again with Covid-19. And once again the argument focuses on a technical legal question about the meaning of the word necessary. The court gave the right answer in 1819. If it gets it wrong this time, thousands will die.

Karen Alter | The International Court of Justice in Comparison: Understanding the Court's Limited Influence

January 4, 2022 – from ProQuest
The International Court of Justice ('ICJ') is the oldest international court in operation, with the authority to adjudicate cases raised by any United Nations member. It has the broadest jurisdiction of any international court, since states can designate or seize the ICJ to resolve disputes involving a broad range of interstate or international matters. The ICJ also has an advisory function, which can be used to clarify questions of international law. The potential for the ICJ to hear cases involving so many countries, treaties and issues means that the relative paucity of cases adjudicated across the ICJ's nearly 75 years in operation is noteworthy. This article argues that the greatest limitation of the ICJ is its interstate nature.

Timothy Charlebois | SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada 2021-22

January 3, 2022
PhD Candidate Timothy Charlebois has received an SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship to support his research study at Northwestern University. The SSHRC Doctoral Fellowships support high-calibre students engaged in doctoral programs in the social sciences and humanities. This support allows scholars to fully focus on their doctoral studies, to seek out the best research mentors in their chosen fields, and to contribute to the Canadian research ecosystem during and beyond the tenure of their awards.

John Bullock | Why Leaders’ Competence Is a Life-and-Death Matter

January 3, 2022 – from Institute for Policy Research
Competent elected leaders are often successful in improving the lives of those they serve, but incompetent ones can have an outsized, and even deadly, impact on their citizens, according to IPR political scientist John Bullock. In The Forum, Bullock and Jonathan Bendor of Stanford University argue that researchers should focus more on the competence of elected leaders instead of voter competence, or how well ordinary voters understand politics. The federal government’s mismanagement of the COVID-19 pandemic under the Trump administration led the researchers to update their previous essay on the topic. “In 2020, with the Trump administration's handling of the pandemic, we thought that we had a good example that we could use to elaborate the idea,” Bullock explains.

Andrew Koppelman | The Libertarian Myth at the Heart of Legal Challenges to Biden's Vaccine Mandates

January 2, 2022 – from The Hill
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on President Biden's vaccine mandates on Friday, Jan. 7. Officially, the cases are about questions of federal power, administrative law and the capacity of Congress to delegate authority to agencies. But what is fundamentally driving the litigation is the libertarian myth — one that may be embraced by the new conservative Supreme Court majority — that freedom can be promoted by hamstringing the capacities of government.

James N. Druckman | Experimental Thinking

January 1, 2022 – from Cambridge University Press
Experiments are a central methodology in the social sciences. Scholars from every discipline regularly turn to experiments. Practitioners rely on experimental evidence in evaluating social programs, policies, and institutions. This book is about how to “think” about experiments. It argues that designing a good experiment is a slow moving process (given the host of considerations) which is counter to the current fast moving temptations available in the social sciences. The book includes discussion of the place of experiments in the social science process, the assumptions underlying different types of experiments, the validity of experiments, the application of different designs, how to arrive at experimental questions, the role of replications in experimental research, and the steps involved in designing and conducting “good” experiments.
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